Why do some people get accepted as experts more readily than others?!  Those who are successful push our deeply-embedded, cultural hot buttons to earn 'expert status'.  The 'negotiation of expert status' is introduced in this highly participatory workshop with the help of participants’ experiences and clips from popular films.

Two decades of research are translated into terms and strategies that one can begin to employ immediately.  Participants will be exposed to insights that have been found useful and confronting by professional communicators, managers, teachers, lecturers, top executives, and radio and television audiences in Australia, Europe, and the US.  This material has proven to be a favourite of professional women.

Participants will learn how to recognise and apply:
 
* The informational and relational parts of communication
* The notion of a provisional, negotiated status
* 'Implicature', a process that confounds attempts at unambiguous communication
* Intrinsic and extrinsic expert status
 
Expert status represents the measure of authority that we give to someone who appears to us to know specialised information or skills that can help us, to someone who seems to be knowledgeable, credible, and relevant.  Expert status is a provisional, ‘negotiated’ status, a status that for the moment resides in the eye of the beholder.
 

 


 

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PCST Network

Public Communication of Science and Technology

 

'25 ways to spot an expert'
How people decide who is worth listening to how people decide who is worth listening to

Will Rifkin   University of New South Wales

Why do some people get accepted as experts more readily than others?!  Those who are successful push our deeply-embedded, cultural hot buttons to earn 'expert status'.  The 'negotiation of expert status' is introduced in this highly participatory workshop with the help of participants’ experiences and clips from popular films.

Two decades of research are translated into terms and strategies that one can begin to employ immediately.  Participants will be exposed to insights that have been found useful and confronting by professional communicators, managers, teachers, lecturers, top executives, and radio and television audiences in Australia, Europe, and the US.  This material has proven to be a favourite of professional women.

Participants will learn how to recognise and apply:
 
* The informational and relational parts of communication
* The notion of a provisional, negotiated status
* 'Implicature', a process that confounds attempts at unambiguous communication
* Intrinsic and extrinsic expert status
 
Expert status represents the measure of authority that we give to someone who appears to us to know specialised information or skills that can help us, to someone who seems to be knowledgeable, credible, and relevant.  Expert status is a provisional, ‘negotiated’ status, a status that for the moment resides in the eye of the beholder.
 

 


 

A copy of the full paper has not yet been submitted.

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