Knowledge Management (KM) is above all problem-oriented within groups, organisations and communities. It aims to mobilise diverse know-how and knowledge from heterogeneous people who gather on basis of shared and common interest. Two main orientations (non-exclusive) for conceiving and applying KM could be considered depending on focus put on explicit or tacit knowledge (cf. Nonaka I. & al. from 1991…). In first case, information technologies play a major role, though in second, communication devices and human interactions take the lead to produce creative collaborations and useful knowledge for communities' necessities.

Current PCST activities are mainly content-oriented. The importance and interest of scientific content in itself used to legitimate and validate them. So they might appear as rather isolated in society and attractive above all for people previously convinced of importance of science and PCST, ready to participate without any fear about risk of feeling unable to understand and to appear as stranger or excluded (…). The main concern for PCST could be to reveal itself as an activity devoted above all for "science literate people". Though, taking into account historical three dimensions project of PCST that aims: to recreate community links between world of science and society at large, to make available specialised knowledge for non-specialists, and finally to enable people to be smart and creative, concepts and methods of KM could provide stimulatin orientations and devices for PCST to act as a positive contributor in development, health policies (…) for communities. Being part of community processes that are problem-solving and knowledge-solving orientated, PCST might act as a less visible contributor but yet more effective.

This paper will discuss strategic and tactical issues and implications for PCST to insert and adapt its ways and means in so called Knowledge-based Society. Some case studies illustrate ways public communication of scientific contents don't act anymore as isolated and independent activities but as part of social process that co-generate useful knowledge.

">
 [PCST]
PCST Network

Public Communication of Science and Technology

 

Knowledge management challenges for PCST in the knowledge-based society

Pierre-Marie Fayard   University of Poitiers, France

Knowledge Management (KM) is above all problem-oriented within groups, organisations and communities. It aims to mobilise diverse know-how and knowledge from heterogeneous people who gather on basis of shared and common interest. Two main orientations (non-exclusive) for conceiving and applying KM could be considered depending on focus put on explicit or tacit knowledge (cf. Nonaka I. & al. from 1991…). In first case, information technologies play a major role, though in second, communication devices and human interactions take the lead to produce creative collaborations and useful knowledge for communities' necessities.

Current PCST activities are mainly content-oriented. The importance and interest of scientific content in itself used to legitimate and validate them. So they might appear as rather isolated in society and attractive above all for people previously convinced of importance of science and PCST, ready to participate without any fear about risk of feeling unable to understand and to appear as stranger or excluded (…). The main concern for PCST could be to reveal itself as an activity devoted above all for "science literate people". Though, taking into account historical three dimensions project of PCST that aims: to recreate community links between world of science and society at large, to make available specialised knowledge for non-specialists, and finally to enable people to be smart and creative, concepts and methods of KM could provide stimulatin orientations and devices for PCST to act as a positive contributor in development, health policies (…) for communities. Being part of community processes that are problem-solving and knowledge-solving orientated, PCST might act as a less visible contributor but yet more effective.

This paper will discuss strategic and tactical issues and implications for PCST to insert and adapt its ways and means in so called Knowledge-based Society. Some case studies illustrate ways public communication of scientific contents don't act anymore as isolated and independent activities but as part of social process that co-generate useful knowledge.

A copy of the full paper has not yet been submitted.

BACK TO TOP