The use of deliberative models for public consultation to address policy questions involving technology have become more common in the last decade and a half. These include consensus conferences, citizen juries, scenario workshops and other fora which typically involve intensive learning on the part of lay citizens, interaction and discussion with experts, citizen deliberations and formulation of recommendations to some policy body. This paper describes these different fora, their use in different countries, examines Canadian experiences on GM food and xenotransplantation, and analyzes these fora as mechanisms for making technological decision-making more democratic.

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Public Communication of Science and Technology

 

Making technological democracy work deliberative models of public consultation

Edna F. Einisedel   Communication Studies Program, University of Calgary

The use of deliberative models for public consultation to address policy questions involving technology have become more common in the last decade and a half. These include consensus conferences, citizen juries, scenario workshops and other fora which typically involve intensive learning on the part of lay citizens, interaction and discussion with experts, citizen deliberations and formulation of recommendations to some policy body. This paper describes these different fora, their use in different countries, examines Canadian experiences on GM food and xenotransplantation, and analyzes these fora as mechanisms for making technological decision-making more democratic.

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