Micro Worlds is an electronic science magazine on the Web. Written for students in grades 7-12, their teachers, and the general public, it features information about research at the Advanced Light Source, a third-generation synchrotron radiation facility at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) that is used by scientists from academic, industrial, and government laboratories around the United States and, indeed, the world. Micro Worlds has several unique features that sets it apart from many Web educational projects: it features real science, and the scientists, engineers, and support staff that make outstanding research happen; it connects key science concepts like electromagnetism and light to the way the concepts are used in everyday life, engineering, and science; the material is integrated with hands-on activities that make the student a participant in the learning process; and it is developed by ALS writers in collaboration with teachers and students. Three teaching modules, Exploring the Material World, Kevlar – The Wonder Material, and Selenium – A Window on the Wetlands, guide students on a path of scientific discovery as they unravel clues that lead them on an exploration of the world of materials science.

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MicroWorlds-exploring the structure of materials

Elizabeth Moxon   Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley

Arthur Robinson   Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley

Micro Worlds is an electronic science magazine on the Web. Written for students in grades 7-12, their teachers, and the general public, it features information about research at the Advanced Light Source, a third-generation synchrotron radiation facility at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) that is used by scientists from academic, industrial, and government laboratories around the United States and, indeed, the world. Micro Worlds has several unique features that sets it apart from many Web educational projects: it features real science, and the scientists, engineers, and support staff that make outstanding research happen; it connects key science concepts like electromagnetism and light to the way the concepts are used in everyday life, engineering, and science; the material is integrated with hands-on activities that make the student a participant in the learning process; and it is developed by ALS writers in collaboration with teachers and students. Three teaching modules, Exploring the Material World, Kevlar – The Wonder Material, and Selenium – A Window on the Wetlands, guide students on a path of scientific discovery as they unravel clues that lead them on an exploration of the world of materials science.

A copy of the full paper has not yet been submitted.

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