Conceptual developments in public communication of science and technology.

Science and innovation have played a huge role in the growth and development of New Zealand as a trading nation. Improvements in transportation, refrigeration, pasture management; animal and plant genetics, manufacturing and technology generally have all contributed to the nations growth. Currently, the government is placing even more emphasis on the role innovation and science as a means of creating further growth and improving the wealth and well being of the nation.

But despite the contribution that science has, and continues to make to the growth of the New Zealand economy, some members of the public are afraid, sceptical and concerned about some of the directions that science is taking and the possible consequences to them and future generations.

De-mystifying science and focusing on the benefits of education and innovation are critical to gaining public support for science. To this end the New Zealand government agencies involved in science have set up a number of formal networks so that they can collaboratively promote the benefits of science to the general public. This concept of ‘smart government’ is being widely applied, and in a relatively short space of time some major success have been achieved.

The most significant one is the development of a national television campaign called ‘Innovation in a Minute’. This will see the production of a series of one-minute commercials highlighting different aspects of innovation broadcast, Monday to Friday in the main television news bulletin of the day between 6pm and 7pm. Several other projects have also taken place and others are being considered.

In a small country where resources are limited, the range of people to be communicated to is wide, collaboration and the pooling of resources is both desirable and necessary and has produced some highly successful outcomes.

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Public Communication of Science and Technology

 

Collaboration creates the difference

Peter Burke   Foundation for Research, Science and Technology

Conceptual developments in public communication of science and technology.

Science and innovation have played a huge role in the growth and development of New Zealand as a trading nation. Improvements in transportation, refrigeration, pasture management; animal and plant genetics, manufacturing and technology generally have all contributed to the nations growth. Currently, the government is placing even more emphasis on the role innovation and science as a means of creating further growth and improving the wealth and well being of the nation.

But despite the contribution that science has, and continues to make to the growth of the New Zealand economy, some members of the public are afraid, sceptical and concerned about some of the directions that science is taking and the possible consequences to them and future generations.

De-mystifying science and focusing on the benefits of education and innovation are critical to gaining public support for science. To this end the New Zealand government agencies involved in science have set up a number of formal networks so that they can collaboratively promote the benefits of science to the general public. This concept of ‘smart government’ is being widely applied, and in a relatively short space of time some major success have been achieved.

The most significant one is the development of a national television campaign called ‘Innovation in a Minute’. This will see the production of a series of one-minute commercials highlighting different aspects of innovation broadcast, Monday to Friday in the main television news bulletin of the day between 6pm and 7pm. Several other projects have also taken place and others are being considered.

In a small country where resources are limited, the range of people to be communicated to is wide, collaboration and the pooling of resources is both desirable and necessary and has produced some highly successful outcomes.

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