The understanding and the attitude of the Korean people for the science and technology were surveyed. The results from the two age groups, 13-17 and above 18, were analyzed and compared with the survey results from U. S. A. and Europe. In general, people of all the survey groups were favorable toward science and scientists. Seventy % of Korean were interested in new scientific discoveries; significantly lower percentage than in U. S. A. (92%) and Europe (78%). Similar trends were also observed in the interests in the use of new inventions and technologies; Korea (44%), U. S. A. (64%), Europe (64%). They were not interested in science because i) it is not necessary (Korean adults 30%, youth 11%; Europe 16%) and ii) it does not give fun (Korean adults 24%, youth 46%, Europe 31%). In the science knowledge test, however, Korean obtained a score slightly higher than American or European. Both adults (95%) and teenagers (96%) in Korea considered that scientists play the most important role in the development of the society. They considered that scientists contributed more than medical doctors (91%, adults) and teachers/professors (77%, adults). Also noteworthy was the differences between the age groups in Korea; e.g. almost half of Korean teenagers responded that science was not interesting.

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The understanding and the attitude of the korean people for the science and technology

Hyeongjin Cho   Korea Science Foundation and Department of Chemistry, Inha University

The understanding and the attitude of the Korean people for the science and technology were surveyed. The results from the two age groups, 13-17 and above 18, were analyzed and compared with the survey results from U. S. A. and Europe. In general, people of all the survey groups were favorable toward science and scientists. Seventy % of Korean were interested in new scientific discoveries; significantly lower percentage than in U. S. A. (92%) and Europe (78%). Similar trends were also observed in the interests in the use of new inventions and technologies; Korea (44%), U. S. A. (64%), Europe (64%). They were not interested in science because i) it is not necessary (Korean adults 30%, youth 11%; Europe 16%) and ii) it does not give fun (Korean adults 24%, youth 46%, Europe 31%). In the science knowledge test, however, Korean obtained a score slightly higher than American or European. Both adults (95%) and teenagers (96%) in Korea considered that scientists play the most important role in the development of the society. They considered that scientists contributed more than medical doctors (91%, adults) and teachers/professors (77%, adults). Also noteworthy was the differences between the age groups in Korea; e.g. almost half of Korean teenagers responded that science was not interesting.

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