There has been much confusion as to goals and target groups of the initiative "Science in Dialogue" that started in Germany in 1999. On the other hand, this vagueness has left much room for experiments in science communication and dialogue which can now be analysed for further action. The paper will examine examples from the following areas: 1) The rapid development of informal science education at the interface of universities and schools focusing on the research process rather than on scientific facts alone, 2) the "science in fiction" format reaching broad audiences and engaging them in dialogue, 3) "responsive mode" projects, i.e. listening to the needs of the citizen and leading to more public engagement in scientific issues.

Finding a proper European approach to science communication appears to be hopeless, given the great variety of national cultures and languages in Europe. The recently founded grass-roots organisation Euroscience, however, is trying to achieve just that. A big European meeting, the Euroscience Open Forum 2004 (ESOF 2004) is being organised to present front line science, to enhance scientific awareness and to foster a debate on science and society.

">
 [PCST]
PCST Network

Public Communication of Science and Technology

 

Public Communication of S&T
German and European perspectives

Ekkehard Winter   Programme & Funding, Stifterverband fuer die Deutsche Wissenschaft

There has been much confusion as to goals and target groups of the initiative "Science in Dialogue" that started in Germany in 1999. On the other hand, this vagueness has left much room for experiments in science communication and dialogue which can now be analysed for further action. The paper will examine examples from the following areas: 1) The rapid development of informal science education at the interface of universities and schools focusing on the research process rather than on scientific facts alone, 2) the "science in fiction" format reaching broad audiences and engaging them in dialogue, 3) "responsive mode" projects, i.e. listening to the needs of the citizen and leading to more public engagement in scientific issues.

Finding a proper European approach to science communication appears to be hopeless, given the great variety of national cultures and languages in Europe. The recently founded grass-roots organisation Euroscience, however, is trying to achieve just that. A big European meeting, the Euroscience Open Forum 2004 (ESOF 2004) is being organised to present front line science, to enhance scientific awareness and to foster a debate on science and society.

[PDF 44.25 kB]Download the full paper (PDF 44.25 kB)

BACK TO TOP