SCIRAB (Science in radio broadcasting) was born as a one year EU funded-project aimed at constructing a network of journalists, scientists and researchers in order to exchange knowledge and experiences and set up a benchmarking process to evaluate the role of the radio in the challenge of the public engagement in science and technology. SCIRAB has surveyed science radio programs broadcasted throughout Europe, made contacts with producers, and constructed a website devoted to communication within practitioners. A high quality, on going communication between these programs will help sharing best ideas and best practices, and developing an international dimension of science communication through the radio. Through a survey of science radio programs and three meetings, SCIRAB has provided guidelines to evaluate different approaches on how to deal with science and technology on the radio and assess their impact on public perception of science.

SCIRAB aims at giving a contribution to the literature specifically discussing the role of the radio in science communication, through the study of the potential of radio in stimulating the dialogue between scientists and society at large. In radio programs, scientists have the opportunity of directly presenting their work, in a much less structured framework than TV; listener often have the opportunity of directly pose questions to the scientists; the deep concerns, hopes and motivations of both have a great chance to emerge, beyond the mere transfer of scientific information: the radio provides a unique opportunity to breed familiarity between scientists and public.

Quantitative and qualitative results of the radio survey conducted in 2004 are presented, along with some comments on the way editorial choices reflect views and assumptions on the role given to science communication.

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PCST Network

Public Communication of Science and Technology

 

Scirab
Science in radio broadcasting

Matteo Merzagora   Innovations in the Communication of Science (ICS), Science and Society Sector, International School for Advanced Studies (SISSA), Trieste, Italy

Marzia Mazzonetto   SISSA Medialab, Trieste, Italy

Elisabetta Tola   Formicablu s.r.l, Bologna, Italy

SCIRAB (Science in radio broadcasting) was born as a one year EU funded-project aimed at constructing a network of journalists, scientists and researchers in order to exchange knowledge and experiences and set up a benchmarking process to evaluate the role of the radio in the challenge of the public engagement in science and technology. SCIRAB has surveyed science radio programs broadcasted throughout Europe, made contacts with producers, and constructed a website devoted to communication within practitioners. A high quality, on going communication between these programs will help sharing best ideas and best practices, and developing an international dimension of science communication through the radio. Through a survey of science radio programs and three meetings, SCIRAB has provided guidelines to evaluate different approaches on how to deal with science and technology on the radio and assess their impact on public perception of science.

SCIRAB aims at giving a contribution to the literature specifically discussing the role of the radio in science communication, through the study of the potential of radio in stimulating the dialogue between scientists and society at large. In radio programs, scientists have the opportunity of directly presenting their work, in a much less structured framework than TV; listener often have the opportunity of directly pose questions to the scientists; the deep concerns, hopes and motivations of both have a great chance to emerge, beyond the mere transfer of scientific information: the radio provides a unique opportunity to breed familiarity between scientists and public.

Quantitative and qualitative results of the radio survey conducted in 2004 are presented, along with some comments on the way editorial choices reflect views and assumptions on the role given to science communication.

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