Scientific inquiry is one of the ways that students understand how scientific knowledge is constructed. The purpose of this study was to analyze one science teacher’s understandings and his explicit teaching strategies for student argumentation in the classroom. One middle school science teacher and his students of 54 participated in this study. Data were collected through three times of semi-structured interviews, 60 hours of classroom observations, and two times of students’ lab reports for eight weeks. Three different argument analyzing tools were employed to develop Scientific Argumentation Table (SAT) and analyze student discourse as responses to those explicit teaching strategies. The results indicated that teacher defined scientific inquiry as the combination of students’ hands-on activity and the abilities of reasoning skills. Claim-Evidence Approach provided students with opportunities to develop their own claims based on their readings, design the investigation for evidences, and differentiate evidences from data to support their claims and refute others. The teacher’s role of scaffolding was critical to shift students’ less extensive to more extensive argumentation through his prompts and questions. The teacher’s involvement, his explicit teaching strategy, and students’ scientific knowledge influenced students’ abilities of developing argumentation and its quality.

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The opportunity of scientific argumentation in the classroom
Claim-evidence approach

Young-Shin Park   Seoul National University

Chan-Jong Kim   Seoul National University

Scientific inquiry is one of the ways that students understand how scientific knowledge is constructed. The purpose of this study was to analyze one science teacher’s understandings and his explicit teaching strategies for student argumentation in the classroom. One middle school science teacher and his students of 54 participated in this study. Data were collected through three times of semi-structured interviews, 60 hours of classroom observations, and two times of students’ lab reports for eight weeks. Three different argument analyzing tools were employed to develop Scientific Argumentation Table (SAT) and analyze student discourse as responses to those explicit teaching strategies. The results indicated that teacher defined scientific inquiry as the combination of students’ hands-on activity and the abilities of reasoning skills. Claim-Evidence Approach provided students with opportunities to develop their own claims based on their readings, design the investigation for evidences, and differentiate evidences from data to support their claims and refute others. The teacher’s role of scaffolding was critical to shift students’ less extensive to more extensive argumentation through his prompts and questions. The teacher’s involvement, his explicit teaching strategy, and students’ scientific knowledge influenced students’ abilities of developing argumentation and its quality.

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