SAARC  (South Asian  Association  for Regional  Cooperation)  countries live  in various  layers, such   as  social,   cultural,   political,   religious,   scientific,   economical,   and  natural.   The   bilateral   and multilateral  sharing,  exchange, interaction  and communication   between  these layers  can mark  a turning point of the process of overall  development of the region and role  of public communication of  science and  technology  could be  crucial  and  vital in  this regard.  Though,  there exist   a  variety of  programmes  and  activities for taking  science to masses and inculcating  a scientific  bent of mind into them, generally, it  was  observed that  all  these layers   are  working in isolation  and  there  is  hardly any interaction.   The  present  study discovers  a range  of  modes and means of   science communication  prevalent  in these countries  and  tries to identify  some common  threads amongst them to  make them more interactive  and communicative  to each other  so that   they  can  also  share the  power  of  scientific   knowledge and  scientific   wisdom. It emerged  that  science   communication  through various   media,  be  it   print, broadcast,  digital,   folk  or interactive  in   developing   countries,  especially   in  SAARC   region,  i.e.,  Bangladesh,   Bhutan,  India, Maldives, Nepal,  Pakistan,  and Sri-Lanka deserves much more serious   efforts to  be able to enhance their abysmally   low  level   of  scientific   literacy,   eradicate   superstitions,   and   achieve   a  baseline   public understanding  of   science.  It  is   the  high time   to  draw  advantages from  the  programmes  like   Sixth  Framework  of   the  European  Union   especially   meant  for   scientific   cooperation   (including science  communication)  between EU and developing   countries. A  close interaction  and communication  between  these layers  would make them more responsive to  each other  as well as paving  the way to  develop better understanding and cooperation leading to sustainable  development.

 

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Public Communication of Science and Technology

 

Science communication in South Asia
Challenges and prospects

Manoj Patairiya   National Council for Science & Technology Communication

SAARC  (South Asian  Association  for Regional  Cooperation)  countries live  in various  layers, such   as  social,   cultural,   political,   religious,   scientific,   economical,   and  natural.   The   bilateral   and multilateral  sharing,  exchange, interaction  and communication   between  these layers  can mark  a turning point of the process of overall  development of the region and role  of public communication of  science and  technology  could be  crucial  and  vital in  this regard.  Though,  there exist   a  variety of  programmes  and  activities for taking  science to masses and inculcating  a scientific  bent of mind into them, generally, it  was  observed that  all  these layers   are  working in isolation  and  there  is  hardly any interaction.   The  present  study discovers  a range  of  modes and means of   science communication  prevalent  in these countries  and  tries to identify  some common  threads amongst them to  make them more interactive  and communicative  to each other  so that   they  can  also  share the  power  of  scientific   knowledge and  scientific   wisdom. It emerged  that  science   communication  through various   media,  be  it   print, broadcast,  digital,   folk  or interactive  in   developing   countries,  especially   in  SAARC   region,  i.e.,  Bangladesh,   Bhutan,  India, Maldives, Nepal,  Pakistan,  and Sri-Lanka deserves much more serious   efforts to  be able to enhance their abysmally   low  level   of  scientific   literacy,   eradicate   superstitions,   and   achieve   a  baseline   public understanding  of   science.  It  is   the  high time   to  draw  advantages from  the  programmes  like   Sixth  Framework  of   the  European  Union   especially   meant  for   scientific   cooperation   (including science  communication)  between EU and developing   countries. A  close interaction  and communication  between  these layers  would make them more responsive to  each other  as well as paving  the way to  develop better understanding and cooperation leading to sustainable  development.

 

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