The school science is often criticized as being too remote from learners’ interest and needs. Although science is mainly taught based on textbooks inside classrooms, the learning of science can not be confined to the boundaries of curriculum and school. Firstly, this paper reviews briefly and characterizes the historical development of science education with a series analogies, and then suggests a new analogy so-called ‘Hearts-On’ science education which emphasizes the humanistic aspects and the context dimension of science education. Secondly, it critically examines how much traditional school science, particularly physics, teaching is limited in terms of the context of learning (i.e.textbook, laboratory, classroom, local, and global) as well as in terms of the context of contents (i.e. physical, personal, social, and global). Thirdly, some recent attempts initiated by the author and colleagues are explained as the examples of the Hearts-On science education. Especially, a series of community-based science programs led by SNU and the development of the books of ‘Contextual Physics’ (i.e. Body Physics, Wearing Physics, Dining Table Physics, and Sports Physics) are outlined with their processes and outcomes. It is hoped that these attempts help us reconsider what would be the goals of science education and how we could expand the world of science education beyond the boundaries of curriculum and school.

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Humanizing science with context
Some context-rich approaches to teaching physics

Jinwoong Song   Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea

The school science is often criticized as being too remote from learners’ interest and needs. Although science is mainly taught based on textbooks inside classrooms, the learning of science can not be confined to the boundaries of curriculum and school. Firstly, this paper reviews briefly and characterizes the historical development of science education with a series analogies, and then suggests a new analogy so-called ‘Hearts-On’ science education which emphasizes the humanistic aspects and the context dimension of science education. Secondly, it critically examines how much traditional school science, particularly physics, teaching is limited in terms of the context of learning (i.e.textbook, laboratory, classroom, local, and global) as well as in terms of the context of contents (i.e. physical, personal, social, and global). Thirdly, some recent attempts initiated by the author and colleagues are explained as the examples of the Hearts-On science education. Especially, a series of community-based science programs led by SNU and the development of the books of ‘Contextual Physics’ (i.e. Body Physics, Wearing Physics, Dining Table Physics, and Sports Physics) are outlined with their processes and outcomes. It is hoped that these attempts help us reconsider what would be the goals of science education and how we could expand the world of science education beyond the boundaries of curriculum and school.

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