The Science Interpreter Training Program (SITP) in the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences at the University of Tokyo in Japan was launched in October 2005. This paper describes this program from the viewpoints of the graduate students enrolled in the program after the first half year of the eighteen-month program.

The word “interpreter” includes the meaning of providing insight on science, technology, and society to the public and to researchers. The faculty of the program comes from many different graduate schools and institutes of the university and also includes journalists, artists, NPO personnel, etc. The fourteen students are from nine different graduate schools. Their (our) motives for the program and impressions vary greatly. By using the opportunity to get together, the students are beginning collaborating projects.

The future goals of the students are also diverse. The experience of learning skills and attitudes for science and technology communication here will help them in many situations even outside science and technology communication.

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The first half year of the science interpreter training program at the university of Tokyo
From the viewpoints of graduate students

Tomohisa Sumida   SITP, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, University of Tokyo, Japan

Mio Furutani   Graduate School of Medical Science, University of Tokyo, Japan

Takashi Noguchi   SITP, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, University of Tokyo, Japan

Yurika Tachibana   SITP, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, University of Tokyo, Japan

The Science Interpreter Training Program (SITP) in the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences at the University of Tokyo in Japan was launched in October 2005. This paper describes this program from the viewpoints of the graduate students enrolled in the program after the first half year of the eighteen-month program.

The word “interpreter” includes the meaning of providing insight on science, technology, and society to the public and to researchers. The faculty of the program comes from many different graduate schools and institutes of the university and also includes journalists, artists, NPO personnel, etc. The fourteen students are from nine different graduate schools. Their (our) motives for the program and impressions vary greatly. By using the opportunity to get together, the students are beginning collaborating projects.

The future goals of the students are also diverse. The experience of learning skills and attitudes for science and technology communication here will help them in many situations even outside science and technology communication.

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