Arts-science collaborations are productive endeavors for the development of major new inter-disciplinary projects and activities that benefit not only those involved but wider society. However, as the barriers between the arts and sciences blur, new challenges are emerging for science communication.

Interaction between the arts, humanities and science has often been seen as fairly simple and one-directional, one sector using the tools of the other for their own benefit. For example, advances in science and computer technology provide creative artists with new tools and inspiration. Tools from the social sciences are applied to help overcome the social, moral and economic challenges resultant from scientific and technological advances in areas such as genetics, nanotechnology and environmental management.

This dynamic is changing with scientists, artists and others working together on projects as valuable as understanding of how the brain perceives and responds to external signals, dealing with interactions between ‘patients’ and healthcare professionals, and creating more viable rural communities. These collaborations also provide new approaches to the public engagement with science and technology.

However, these cross-sectoral collaborations often require a reshaping of identity for those involved in order for them to communicate effectively. Using approaches taken from social psychology, this paper will look at the constraints and opportunities for eross-sectoral communication occurring within Australia and overseas and provide some recommendations based around the management of identity for those involved in cross-sectorial communication.

">
 [PCST]
PCST Network

Public Communication of Science and Technology

 

Arts-science collaborations
An identity perspective

Michelle Ricdlinger   Econnect Communication

Jenni Metcalfe   Econnect Communication

Arts-science collaborations are productive endeavors for the development of major new inter-disciplinary projects and activities that benefit not only those involved but wider society. However, as the barriers between the arts and sciences blur, new challenges are emerging for science communication.

Interaction between the arts, humanities and science has often been seen as fairly simple and one-directional, one sector using the tools of the other for their own benefit. For example, advances in science and computer technology provide creative artists with new tools and inspiration. Tools from the social sciences are applied to help overcome the social, moral and economic challenges resultant from scientific and technological advances in areas such as genetics, nanotechnology and environmental management.

This dynamic is changing with scientists, artists and others working together on projects as valuable as understanding of how the brain perceives and responds to external signals, dealing with interactions between ‘patients’ and healthcare professionals, and creating more viable rural communities. These collaborations also provide new approaches to the public engagement with science and technology.

However, these cross-sectoral collaborations often require a reshaping of identity for those involved in order for them to communicate effectively. Using approaches taken from social psychology, this paper will look at the constraints and opportunities for eross-sectoral communication occurring within Australia and overseas and provide some recommendations based around the management of identity for those involved in cross-sectorial communication.

A copy of the full paper has not yet been submitted.

BACK TO TOP