The People’s Science Movement (PSM) wants to use science as a tool for social emancipation and as an agent of social transformation. However, this paper takes up the issue of people’s science movement which sees science as social activism in the framework of popularization of science, science as a means of social and cultural criticism, teaching science as a method of inquiry, promoting indigenous knowledge, making science and technology socially relevant and people-centered, stimulating mass creativity, science communication etc. The origin of the people's science movement in India may be traced to the early 1950s when a number of organizations emerged with the aim of creating scientific awareness among the general public. The Kerala Shastra Sahitya Parishad (KSSP), the Marathi Vidnyan Parishad (MVP), the Delhi Science Forum (DSF) and the Bhopal-based Eklavya are the more prominent among them. They began dissemination of information about science and technology (S&T) by publishing literature in various Indian languages. These emergent science communication organizations became the obvious forums which enable people to have more say in how and where science, should be used. It is the use of science, in one way or the other, in the activities of these organizations which has created a common thread bringing them together under the banner of PSM. The paper based on the sociological perspective of New Social Movement (NSM) i.e. from mobilization to institutionalization, analyzes the people’s science movement in India since 1950s that has gradually been transformed into institutions and these shifts can be seen as part of an historical trajectory i.e. life cycle of a movement. People’s science movement is a significant event which asserts that a culture of ‘people’s science’ is emerged in this region in South Asia; that knowledge created in institutions alien from the people is returning to the people.

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Public Communication of Science and Technology

 

People’s science movement in late xxth century India presented at the 9th international conference on public communication of science and technology

Subhasis Sahoo   Department of Humanities and Social Sciences (H&SS), Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur,

Binay Kumar Pattnaik   epartment of Humanities and Social Sciences (H&SS), Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur

The People’s Science Movement (PSM) wants to use science as a tool for social emancipation and as an agent of social transformation. However, this paper takes up the issue of people’s science movement which sees science as social activism in the framework of popularization of science, science as a means of social and cultural criticism, teaching science as a method of inquiry, promoting indigenous knowledge, making science and technology socially relevant and people-centered, stimulating mass creativity, science communication etc. The origin of the people's science movement in India may be traced to the early 1950s when a number of organizations emerged with the aim of creating scientific awareness among the general public. The Kerala Shastra Sahitya Parishad (KSSP), the Marathi Vidnyan Parishad (MVP), the Delhi Science Forum (DSF) and the Bhopal-based Eklavya are the more prominent among them. They began dissemination of information about science and technology (S&T) by publishing literature in various Indian languages. These emergent science communication organizations became the obvious forums which enable people to have more say in how and where science, should be used. It is the use of science, in one way or the other, in the activities of these organizations which has created a common thread bringing them together under the banner of PSM. The paper based on the sociological perspective of New Social Movement (NSM) i.e. from mobilization to institutionalization, analyzes the people’s science movement in India since 1950s that has gradually been transformed into institutions and these shifts can be seen as part of an historical trajectory i.e. life cycle of a movement. People’s science movement is a significant event which asserts that a culture of ‘people’s science’ is emerged in this region in South Asia; that knowledge created in institutions alien from the people is returning to the people.

A copy of the full paper has not yet been submitted.

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