The purpose of this study is to identify and compare the major factors affecting the professional development of beginning science teachers in Korea and U.S. Participants are four beginning secondary science teachers in Seoul Metropolitan Area, Korea and four in the Midwest, U.S. We videotaped science classes and conducted semi-structured interviews. We collected instructional materials, too. All data were carefully transcribed and analyzed. The major findings are as follows.

First, the major factors affecting the professional development in both countries are designated identity and school contexts such as assessment and preparing for tests. Several contextual factors, such as, science textbooks and clerical duties affected Korean participants, whereas, mentor teachers during internship affected the U.S. beginning teachers.

Second, the major difficulties and concerns of participants in both countries are classroom management and strengthening their own content knowledge. Third, designated identities played an important role in deciding current and future classroom practices.

Fourth, participants in U.S. were heavily affected by mentor teachers during their internship. However, Korean participants were not affected by mentor teachers during student teaching but affected by more various factors than teachers in U.S.

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The factorsaffecting the professional development of beginning teachers
Comparative study between Korean and U.S. beginning teachers

KyungJin Kim   Seoul National University

Chan-Jong Kim   Seoul National University

Charles W. Anderson   Michigan State University

The purpose of this study is to identify and compare the major factors affecting the professional development of beginning science teachers in Korea and U.S. Participants are four beginning secondary science teachers in Seoul Metropolitan Area, Korea and four in the Midwest, U.S. We videotaped science classes and conducted semi-structured interviews. We collected instructional materials, too. All data were carefully transcribed and analyzed. The major findings are as follows.

First, the major factors affecting the professional development in both countries are designated identity and school contexts such as assessment and preparing for tests. Several contextual factors, such as, science textbooks and clerical duties affected Korean participants, whereas, mentor teachers during internship affected the U.S. beginning teachers.

Second, the major difficulties and concerns of participants in both countries are classroom management and strengthening their own content knowledge. Third, designated identities played an important role in deciding current and future classroom practices.

Fourth, participants in U.S. were heavily affected by mentor teachers during their internship. However, Korean participants were not affected by mentor teachers during student teaching but affected by more various factors than teachers in U.S.

A copy of the full paper has not yet been submitted.

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