Ecologically Sound Development (ESD) has to be accepted by people all over the world, otherwise there cannot be such a development. One can appreciate how big an undertaking it is in enunciating its principles and influencing people to practice them.
 
Depending on their priorities, those in Science and Technology can either hasten or prolong the global undertaking for people to observe and respect the limits of the Earth to sustain humans.
 
The paper briefly traces the spread the of the principle of ESD in the Philippines. Using two cases, lessons on effective science communication of ESD principles and practices are drawn.
 
The first case deals with the experience of helping the public make a stand on the construction and operation of the Bataan Nuclear Power plant. Under restrictive conditions of martial law in the Philippines, information as to how a nuclear reactor works, the hazards of the low-level and high-level radiation to health, life and environment, the demands of permanent disposal of radioactive wastes and of a decommissioned nuclear facility were simplified and disseminated widely throughout the country.
 
Questions of safety arising from the geologic characteristics of the site, the presence of nearby volcanoes, and the frequency of earthquakes were included in the information campaign.
 
Deep down, people especially in the rural areas, feel a strong bond with nature. In this case, scientific information sharpened the sense of survival of many Filipinos and helped them make their stand and struggled for it.
 
A point is made on the need to consider the global context of inequity in which ESD principles and practices are being promoted. A question is posed: What is the social responsibility of science and technology in this whole situation?
 
The second case is that of a series of ecological orientation seminars which Lingkod Tao-Kalikasan, an NGO, started in 1988. The seminar -workshop presents to community leaders the gravity and implications of the ecological crisis and the urgent necessity of working together for Sustainable development.
 
The ecosystems - their functions and state of degradation - are explained to the participants. Also global warming and depletion of the ozone layer and their consequences.
 
The participative way by which these topics are developed to link them with stewardship of creation and the need to live in harmony with the Earth is described. And the importance of the Philippine Agenda is cited.
 
ESD is based on the harmonious relation of humans with the Earth. Suggestions on what and how science can communicate to foster and reinforce this are made. A pitfall in the use of scientific method of regarding nature as an object and no as a subject to relate with, is pointed out. Also the need to be conscious of this.
 
The paper ends with a challenge to scientists and science communicators to listen and learn from the Earth not only to be able to communicate ESD creatively and effectively but more, to be better in touch with themselves.
">
 [PCST]
PCST Network

Public Communication of Science and Technology

 

Science Communication in promoting ecologically sound development

Aida Velasquez   Secretariat for an Ecologically Sound Philippines

Ecologically Sound Development (ESD) has to be accepted by people all over the world, otherwise there cannot be such a development. One can appreciate how big an undertaking it is in enunciating its principles and influencing people to practice them.
 
Depending on their priorities, those in Science and Technology can either hasten or prolong the global undertaking for people to observe and respect the limits of the Earth to sustain humans.
 
The paper briefly traces the spread the of the principle of ESD in the Philippines. Using two cases, lessons on effective science communication of ESD principles and practices are drawn.
 
The first case deals with the experience of helping the public make a stand on the construction and operation of the Bataan Nuclear Power plant. Under restrictive conditions of martial law in the Philippines, information as to how a nuclear reactor works, the hazards of the low-level and high-level radiation to health, life and environment, the demands of permanent disposal of radioactive wastes and of a decommissioned nuclear facility were simplified and disseminated widely throughout the country.
 
Questions of safety arising from the geologic characteristics of the site, the presence of nearby volcanoes, and the frequency of earthquakes were included in the information campaign.
 
Deep down, people especially in the rural areas, feel a strong bond with nature. In this case, scientific information sharpened the sense of survival of many Filipinos and helped them make their stand and struggled for it.
 
A point is made on the need to consider the global context of inequity in which ESD principles and practices are being promoted. A question is posed: What is the social responsibility of science and technology in this whole situation?
 
The second case is that of a series of ecological orientation seminars which Lingkod Tao-Kalikasan, an NGO, started in 1988. The seminar -workshop presents to community leaders the gravity and implications of the ecological crisis and the urgent necessity of working together for Sustainable development.
 
The ecosystems - their functions and state of degradation - are explained to the participants. Also global warming and depletion of the ozone layer and their consequences.
 
The participative way by which these topics are developed to link them with stewardship of creation and the need to live in harmony with the Earth is described. And the importance of the Philippine Agenda is cited.
 
ESD is based on the harmonious relation of humans with the Earth. Suggestions on what and how science can communicate to foster and reinforce this are made. A pitfall in the use of scientific method of regarding nature as an object and no as a subject to relate with, is pointed out. Also the need to be conscious of this.
 
The paper ends with a challenge to scientists and science communicators to listen and learn from the Earth not only to be able to communicate ESD creatively and effectively but more, to be better in touch with themselves.

A copy of the full paper has not yet been submitted.

BACK TO TOP