This position paper will address the increasing international interest in the emerging theoretical discipline of Science Communication. The Australian National University has had in place since 1988 a graduate diploma program, and more recently a Masters and Doctoral program in Science Communication which has attracted high calibre students since its inception. Where are these students headed, and what is the future of the discipline? Participants in this workshop will be invited to assist in defining the boundaries and explaining the role of science communication in the tertiary context. A special consideration will be given to the problems of scientists within the university in communicating about their research.

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Public Communication of Science and Technology

 

Science communication as an academic discipline or a risky business

Chris Bryant  

Michael Gore  

Sue Stocklmayer  

This position paper will address the increasing international interest in the emerging theoretical discipline of Science Communication. The Australian National University has had in place since 1988 a graduate diploma program, and more recently a Masters and Doctoral program in Science Communication which has attracted high calibre students since its inception. Where are these students headed, and what is the future of the discipline? Participants in this workshop will be invited to assist in defining the boundaries and explaining the role of science communication in the tertiary context. A special consideration will be given to the problems of scientists within the university in communicating about their research.

A copy of the full paper has not yet been submitted.

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