In this workshop the outcome of a new and exciting approach to science communication involving collaboration between Universities and Schools (using BISACT, Biological Sciences in ACT Schools - science outreach programme) will be reviewed from both the classroom and University perspective, with short papers, whole group discussions and "hands on" activities.
 
Long Abstract
 
"Scientists are people with glasses that do experiments and blow up rooms".
 
"Scientists live in their own world and are different to normal people".
 
Similar views were expressed often by Australian school children when asked to write about what they thought of Scientists. This exemplifies the “ivory-tower image" of scientists, and the inaccurate perception in general of science in the community. Higher education institutions such as universities can play a significant role in breaking down this image and promoting science. In 1990 we developed a science outreach program in biology which offers support to the existing School Science curriculum from teachers and researchers at University. This program called BISACT (Biological Sciences in ACT Schools) hopes to change perception of science and scientists, of school children. This program explores basic concepts in biology that are relevant to every day living (eg. endangered species, genetic engineering and greenhouse effect). The program runs for one school term in Australia , which is about 10 weeks. Over 20 schools and 3000 school children have now taken part in the program. The success of the program can be seen by the large number of schools who have requested the BISACT program to return to their school every year. In this workshop we describe this new approach to Science communication involving collaboration between Universities and Schools, using BISACT as a case study. The outcomes of this new and exciting approach to science communication will be reviewed from both the classroom and University perspective's, with short papers, whole group discussions and "hands on" activities.
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 [PCST]
PCST Network

Public Communication of Science and Technology

 

Pollinating primary science, universities communicating science in schools

Murali Nayudu  

Merv Aston  

John Vranjic  

John Woodland  

Margaret Willis  

Marilyn Hocking –

In this workshop the outcome of a new and exciting approach to science communication involving collaboration between Universities and Schools (using BISACT, Biological Sciences in ACT Schools - science outreach programme) will be reviewed from both the classroom and University perspective, with short papers, whole group discussions and "hands on" activities.
 
Long Abstract
 
"Scientists are people with glasses that do experiments and blow up rooms".
 
"Scientists live in their own world and are different to normal people".
 
Similar views were expressed often by Australian school children when asked to write about what they thought of Scientists. This exemplifies the “ivory-tower image" of scientists, and the inaccurate perception in general of science in the community. Higher education institutions such as universities can play a significant role in breaking down this image and promoting science. In 1990 we developed a science outreach program in biology which offers support to the existing School Science curriculum from teachers and researchers at University. This program called BISACT (Biological Sciences in ACT Schools) hopes to change perception of science and scientists, of school children. This program explores basic concepts in biology that are relevant to every day living (eg. endangered species, genetic engineering and greenhouse effect). The program runs for one school term in Australia , which is about 10 weeks. Over 20 schools and 3000 school children have now taken part in the program. The success of the program can be seen by the large number of schools who have requested the BISACT program to return to their school every year. In this workshop we describe this new approach to Science communication involving collaboration between Universities and Schools, using BISACT as a case study. The outcomes of this new and exciting approach to science communication will be reviewed from both the classroom and University perspective's, with short papers, whole group discussions and "hands on" activities.

A copy of the full paper has not yet been submitted.

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