A scientific culture activity is a well‐organized systematic activity which connects science and technology with society. The hope is to mend the various problems that are brought up in the course of development of science. Quantitative evaluation of the effect of scientific cultural activities and the public recognition on it are critical for sustainable social evolution. It is especially important to quantify the effects of such activities on the industrial and economic sectors which have been neglected so far.

In current research, the economic ripple effect of domestic scientific cultural activities has been studied through three cases; the National Science Museum, Korea Science Foundation, and Korea Science Festival. An assessment model of the economic impact and the guidance proposed by Groves(2004), which is modified to reflect the domestic situations, has been employed in a full‐scale economic impact assessment. In current research, the cause of the differences was the main focus, rather than the quantitative evaluation of the economic ripple effect of scientific‐cultural activities. It is mainly focused on the differences in the economic ripple effect that results from scientific culture activities, rather than focusing on the differences in the economic impact on the region or duration.

In this study, the target duration and region were first determined by each case, followed by collecting data from the preliminary researches. Direct effect includes the wages of employees, direct cost of the organization and the visitors' expenditure. The secondary effect was then calculated by the multiplier which was obtained through inter‐industry relations analysis. The summary of the research are as follows;

•The National Science Museum has used 11,805 million Korean won in 2004 and earned 19,990 million Korean won in production inducting effects, 3,939 million Korean won in income inducing effects, in addition to this, it has also created 499 jobs.

•The Korea Science Foundation has used 20,072 million Korean won in 2004 and earned 30,478 million Korean won in production inducing effects, 11,347 million Korean won in income inducing effects, in addition to this, it has also created 437 jobs.

•The Korea Science Festival has used 2,051 million Korean won for 6days from July 23 to 28 in 2004 to earn 3,471 million Korean won in production inducing effects, 478 million Korean won in income inducing effects, in addition to this, it has also created 87 jobs.

For current research, with the conclusion from the above case analysis, the comparative study has progressed in each case to determine different economic ripple effects in relation to the category of scientific‐cultural activity. The summary of its results are as follows;

•Economic impact model's collecting data or analyzing method had wider differences in the category of scientific‐cultural activity rather than in the main activity.

•Evaluating methods may vary depending on the business method or target duration even if it belongs in the same category as a result of using item valuation on a case‐by‐case in the economic impact evaluation.

•Ratio of wages of employees, direct cost of the organization and visitors' expenditure that form economic direct effect has its differences regarding main activities.

Three case analyses and the comparative study of the economic ripple effect of domestic scientific culture activity can be concluded as follows;

Firstly, there is definitely a need for reform within the system a systematic plan and evaluation of scientific culture activity must be organized. Secondly, it is necessary to increase the positive research for the multidimensional impact of scientific‐cultural activity. Thirdly, we need to diversify the revenue window of scientific‐cultural activity in order to promote a scientific culture industry as a means to create additional earnings. Fourthly, preliminary data on the study of scientific‐cultural activity impact should be collected and manufactured systematically and needs to be provided for the public. Lastly, various arguments regarding the economic ripple effect of domestic scientific‐cultural activity needs to continuously develop and also we must actively encourage science communication in relation to social issues.

">
 [PCST]
PCST Network

Public Communication of Science and Technology

 

A study of the evaluation of scientific culture activity ‐ from the view of economic effect

Eun Kwon   Korea Science Foundation

A scientific culture activity is a well‐organized systematic activity which connects science and technology with society. The hope is to mend the various problems that are brought up in the course of development of science. Quantitative evaluation of the effect of scientific cultural activities and the public recognition on it are critical for sustainable social evolution. It is especially important to quantify the effects of such activities on the industrial and economic sectors which have been neglected so far.

In current research, the economic ripple effect of domestic scientific cultural activities has been studied through three cases; the National Science Museum, Korea Science Foundation, and Korea Science Festival. An assessment model of the economic impact and the guidance proposed by Groves(2004), which is modified to reflect the domestic situations, has been employed in a full‐scale economic impact assessment. In current research, the cause of the differences was the main focus, rather than the quantitative evaluation of the economic ripple effect of scientific‐cultural activities. It is mainly focused on the differences in the economic ripple effect that results from scientific culture activities, rather than focusing on the differences in the economic impact on the region or duration.

In this study, the target duration and region were first determined by each case, followed by collecting data from the preliminary researches. Direct effect includes the wages of employees, direct cost of the organization and the visitors' expenditure. The secondary effect was then calculated by the multiplier which was obtained through inter‐industry relations analysis. The summary of the research are as follows;

•The National Science Museum has used 11,805 million Korean won in 2004 and earned 19,990 million Korean won in production inducting effects, 3,939 million Korean won in income inducing effects, in addition to this, it has also created 499 jobs.

•The Korea Science Foundation has used 20,072 million Korean won in 2004 and earned 30,478 million Korean won in production inducing effects, 11,347 million Korean won in income inducing effects, in addition to this, it has also created 437 jobs.

•The Korea Science Festival has used 2,051 million Korean won for 6days from July 23 to 28 in 2004 to earn 3,471 million Korean won in production inducing effects, 478 million Korean won in income inducing effects, in addition to this, it has also created 87 jobs.

For current research, with the conclusion from the above case analysis, the comparative study has progressed in each case to determine different economic ripple effects in relation to the category of scientific‐cultural activity. The summary of its results are as follows;

•Economic impact model's collecting data or analyzing method had wider differences in the category of scientific‐cultural activity rather than in the main activity.

•Evaluating methods may vary depending on the business method or target duration even if it belongs in the same category as a result of using item valuation on a case‐by‐case in the economic impact evaluation.

•Ratio of wages of employees, direct cost of the organization and visitors' expenditure that form economic direct effect has its differences regarding main activities.

Three case analyses and the comparative study of the economic ripple effect of domestic scientific culture activity can be concluded as follows;

Firstly, there is definitely a need for reform within the system a systematic plan and evaluation of scientific culture activity must be organized. Secondly, it is necessary to increase the positive research for the multidimensional impact of scientific‐cultural activity. Thirdly, we need to diversify the revenue window of scientific‐cultural activity in order to promote a scientific culture industry as a means to create additional earnings. Fourthly, preliminary data on the study of scientific‐cultural activity impact should be collected and manufactured systematically and needs to be provided for the public. Lastly, various arguments regarding the economic ripple effect of domestic scientific‐cultural activity needs to continuously develop and also we must actively encourage science communication in relation to social issues.

A copy of the full paper has not yet been submitted.

BACK TO TOP