Many major scientific facilities throughout the world are located outside of universities and in rural regions. Typically, these facilities are committed to providing information about their work and gaining the good will of their host communities. We are working with facilities to enable them to achieve the above objectives and more by means of science-arts collaborations.

We have a decade-long experience with the series Science & the Arts at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York. Through this series more than 10 science- arts events per year are developed for the general public in the form of theatrical readings and performances, dances, musical events and a variety of cultural offerings. We are currently working with science facilities in rural locations, removed from university centers and major, integrated arts/cultural environments. The facilities have distinct and different minority communities (which will inform the outreach efforts and establish collaborations with each facility in developing science-arts programs of particular interest to those communities); and, present new challenges and opportunities. Specifically we are working with National Science Foundation (NSF) facilities in 3 diverse locations: the Homestake Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory (DUSEL) facility in Lead, South Dakota http://www.dusel.org/ and the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) installations in Livingston, Louisiana http://www.ligo-la.caltech.edu/ and Hanford, Washington http://www.ligo-wa.caltech.edu/. DUSEL’s flagship experiments focus on areas of subatomic physics such as detection of dark matter particles and proton decay. LIGO is an important tool in the fields of physics and astronomy by means of its research into the nature of gravity.

We have developed relationships with the directors and staffs of these science facilities and hosted them in New York for an international conference on Communication Science to the Public through the Performing Arts www.sciartconference2010.com. We have also reached out to arts organizations and groups in the DUSEL and LIGO communities, and have helped establish partnerships between the facilities and their local arts communities. We are working in all 3 facility locations to expand and enhance community outreach and educational activities by co-developing a strategy to enable them to communicate science using theater, music and dance programs.

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Public Communication of Science and Technology

 

Partnering with science facilities to promote science communication through the performing arts

Linda Merman   The Graduate Center of the City University of New York

Brian Schwartz   The Graduate Center of the City University of New York and Brooklyn College

Many major scientific facilities throughout the world are located outside of universities and in rural regions. Typically, these facilities are committed to providing information about their work and gaining the good will of their host communities. We are working with facilities to enable them to achieve the above objectives and more by means of science-arts collaborations.

We have a decade-long experience with the series Science & the Arts at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York. Through this series more than 10 science- arts events per year are developed for the general public in the form of theatrical readings and performances, dances, musical events and a variety of cultural offerings. We are currently working with science facilities in rural locations, removed from university centers and major, integrated arts/cultural environments. The facilities have distinct and different minority communities (which will inform the outreach efforts and establish collaborations with each facility in developing science-arts programs of particular interest to those communities); and, present new challenges and opportunities. Specifically we are working with National Science Foundation (NSF) facilities in 3 diverse locations: the Homestake Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory (DUSEL) facility in Lead, South Dakota http://www.dusel.org/ and the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) installations in Livingston, Louisiana http://www.ligo-la.caltech.edu/ and Hanford, Washington http://www.ligo-wa.caltech.edu/. DUSEL’s flagship experiments focus on areas of subatomic physics such as detection of dark matter particles and proton decay. LIGO is an important tool in the fields of physics and astronomy by means of its research into the nature of gravity.

We have developed relationships with the directors and staffs of these science facilities and hosted them in New York for an international conference on Communication Science to the Public through the Performing Arts www.sciartconference2010.com. We have also reached out to arts organizations and groups in the DUSEL and LIGO communities, and have helped establish partnerships between the facilities and their local arts communities. We are working in all 3 facility locations to expand and enhance community outreach and educational activities by co-developing a strategy to enable them to communicate science using theater, music and dance programs.

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