The International Service for the Acquisition of Agri-biotech Applications (ISAAA) is a not-for-profit international organization that shares the benefits of crop biotechnology to various stakeholders, particularly resource-poor farmers in developing countries, through knowledge sharing initiatives and the transfer and delivery of proprietary biotechnology applications. ISAAA has an information network composed of the Global Knowledge Center on Crop Biotechnology (popularly known as KC) and 27 Biotechnology Information Centers (BICs) or country nodes located in Africa, Asia, Latin America, and Europe. It is probably the only one of its kind in the world today.

With its global mandate, the KC critically scans global and regional developments and analyzes issues and concerns that affect developing countries. This information is transformed into prototype science communication strategies that the BICs adapt for their clients’ specific information needs to advance a broader public understanding of crop biotechnology. The network uses an array of multi-media communication approaches, networking and various interpersonal formats.

The information network has enabled policy makers, scientists, academics, media practitioners, farmers, and other interest groups to participate in a transparent and science-based discussion and debate on the technology. Country case studies of how they have operationalized science communication are documented in the book Communication Challenges and Convergence in Crop Biotechnology (Navarro and Hautea, 2011). Experiences are forwarded on how countries have addressed communication challenges by introducing innovative approaches, building capacity for science communicators, and integrating efforts among public and private sectors in knowledge sharing initiatives. Lessons learned are forwarded on how best to contribute to a better appreciation and understanding of biotechnology despite its being a perceived controversial topic. Countries demonstrated that it is not a case of Science then Communication but Science Communication.

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 [PCST]
PCST Network

Public Communication of Science and Technology

 

Science communication initiatives in developing countries
Global information network on crop biotechnology

Mariechel Navarro   Manager, Global Knowledge Center on Crop Biotechnology, ISAAA

Randy Hautea   Global Coordinator, ISAAA

The International Service for the Acquisition of Agri-biotech Applications (ISAAA) is a not-for-profit international organization that shares the benefits of crop biotechnology to various stakeholders, particularly resource-poor farmers in developing countries, through knowledge sharing initiatives and the transfer and delivery of proprietary biotechnology applications. ISAAA has an information network composed of the Global Knowledge Center on Crop Biotechnology (popularly known as KC) and 27 Biotechnology Information Centers (BICs) or country nodes located in Africa, Asia, Latin America, and Europe. It is probably the only one of its kind in the world today.

With its global mandate, the KC critically scans global and regional developments and analyzes issues and concerns that affect developing countries. This information is transformed into prototype science communication strategies that the BICs adapt for their clients’ specific information needs to advance a broader public understanding of crop biotechnology. The network uses an array of multi-media communication approaches, networking and various interpersonal formats.

The information network has enabled policy makers, scientists, academics, media practitioners, farmers, and other interest groups to participate in a transparent and science-based discussion and debate on the technology. Country case studies of how they have operationalized science communication are documented in the book Communication Challenges and Convergence in Crop Biotechnology (Navarro and Hautea, 2011). Experiences are forwarded on how countries have addressed communication challenges by introducing innovative approaches, building capacity for science communicators, and integrating efforts among public and private sectors in knowledge sharing initiatives. Lessons learned are forwarded on how best to contribute to a better appreciation and understanding of biotechnology despite its being a perceived controversial topic. Countries demonstrated that it is not a case of Science then Communication but Science Communication.

A copy of the full paper has not yet been submitted.

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