How do U.S. federal agencies identify and keep up with the latest technology to get their messages out effectively and widely? And is it possible to have any influence over what the media covers when there’s strong competition for attention and diminishing newsrooms? Participants will learn about how one independent U.S. federal agency, the National Science Foundation (NSF), has charged ahead with national media partnerships and new communication platforms to change positively how and where Americans get their news. They will hear about how scientists are equal partners in telling stories about their research and its impact on a global society. In 2009 at the World Conference of Science Journalists, NSF spurred an international debate about the line between science journalism and science communication. Since then, media centres from various countries have emulated NSF’s efforts to communicate science broadly. Participants to this session, led by NSF, will engage with panelists from various U.S. media outlets and international government media centres to deconstruct best practices and upcoming challenges in the ever-changing world of science communications.

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Public Communication of Science and Technology

 

The ever-changing U.S. Science Communications Landscape
How one federal agency is setting the pace

Dana Topousis   U.S. National Science Foundation

How do U.S. federal agencies identify and keep up with the latest technology to get their messages out effectively and widely? And is it possible to have any influence over what the media covers when there’s strong competition for attention and diminishing newsrooms? Participants will learn about how one independent U.S. federal agency, the National Science Foundation (NSF), has charged ahead with national media partnerships and new communication platforms to change positively how and where Americans get their news. They will hear about how scientists are equal partners in telling stories about their research and its impact on a global society. In 2009 at the World Conference of Science Journalists, NSF spurred an international debate about the line between science journalism and science communication. Since then, media centres from various countries have emulated NSF’s efforts to communicate science broadly. Participants to this session, led by NSF, will engage with panelists from various U.S. media outlets and international government media centres to deconstruct best practices and upcoming challenges in the ever-changing world of science communications.

A copy of the full paper has not yet been submitted.

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