Children's films are part of the universe and the daily lives of children. Far from constituting impartial and neutral in their representations, they are full of meanings and discourses that influence the constitution of the child, collaborate to the formation of contemporary identities of children, support new forms of representation and produce other cultures, establishing itself as authentic archetypes of social prestige in a society that focuses on culture media. This article aims to analyze, in the light of cultural studies, the film Frankenweenie. Produced by Disney, directed by Tim Burton and written by John August, Frankenweenie is a stop-motion animated film that tells the story of Victor Frankenstein, a small scientist who lost his dog Spark in a car accident and after de loss decides to resurrect the animal through a scientific experiment. The main objective of this article is to analyze how the processes related to the marking of gender identities and reinforcement of stereotypes associated with scientists and scientific practice are present in Frankenweenie. The methodology applied to this article will be the content analysis, a method characterized by using a set of techniques that attempt to describe and interpret communication contents. Through content analysis, it is expected to understand the messages in the film and analyze it on a deeper level. This study will allow the crossing of discourses on science to the field of scientific divulgation, showing that cultural production can be excellent sources of research on cultural studies of science.

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Cine and child
An analysis of the stereotypes present in the children's film Frankenweenie

Graziele Ap. de Moraes Scalfi   Universidade Estadual de Campinas

Maísa Maryelli de Oliveira   Universidade Estadual de Campinas

Children's films are part of the universe and the daily lives of children. Far from constituting impartial and neutral in their representations, they are full of meanings and discourses that influence the constitution of the child, collaborate to the formation of contemporary identities of children, support new forms of representation and produce other cultures, establishing itself as authentic archetypes of social prestige in a society that focuses on culture media. This article aims to analyze, in the light of cultural studies, the film Frankenweenie. Produced by Disney, directed by Tim Burton and written by John August, Frankenweenie is a stop-motion animated film that tells the story of Victor Frankenstein, a small scientist who lost his dog Spark in a car accident and after de loss decides to resurrect the animal through a scientific experiment. The main objective of this article is to analyze how the processes related to the marking of gender identities and reinforcement of stereotypes associated with scientists and scientific practice are present in Frankenweenie. The methodology applied to this article will be the content analysis, a method characterized by using a set of techniques that attempt to describe and interpret communication contents. Through content analysis, it is expected to understand the messages in the film and analyze it on a deeper level. This study will allow the crossing of discourses on science to the field of scientific divulgation, showing that cultural production can be excellent sources of research on cultural studies of science.

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