While environmental change will expose different regions to different impacts, the extent of those impacts and effective responses at the local level will be determined not only by the location‘s sensitivity and vulnerability but also by local groups and individuals‘ capacity, including their institutional links, social networks and motivation to action. In parallel, scientific information plays a critical and ambivalent role in informing environmental change adaptation by providing both an improved understanding of the climate risks and response alternatives (Serrao-Neumann et al., 2013). How to make climate science more accessible and useful to decision-making? How communicate risks and uncertainties in a way that allows science producers and users to own the problem and set common goals together? How to deal with climate challenges pose for science communication? In this panel session, we seek to explore these questions through a debate on two-way communication channels involving scientists, practitioners and community users for improving understanding about how stakeholders perceive and respond to climate risks, as well as fostering bilateral cooperation for both the identification of knowledge gaps and dissemination of available knowledge. 

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Public Communication of Science and Technology

 

Communicating risks and uncertainties of global environmental change and extreme events

Gabriela Marques Di Giulio   School of Public Health – University of São Paulo, Brazil

José Eduardo Viglio   Environmental Studies Center – University of Campinas, Brazil

Phil Macnaghten   Geography Department – Durham University, UK Science and Technology Policy Department – University of Campinas, Brazil

Jens Oliver Zinn   School of Social and Political Sciences, Melbourne University, Australia

While environmental change will expose different regions to different impacts, the extent of those impacts and effective responses at the local level will be determined not only by the location‘s sensitivity and vulnerability but also by local groups and individuals‘ capacity, including their institutional links, social networks and motivation to action. In parallel, scientific information plays a critical and ambivalent role in informing environmental change adaptation by providing both an improved understanding of the climate risks and response alternatives (Serrao-Neumann et al., 2013). How to make climate science more accessible and useful to decision-making? How communicate risks and uncertainties in a way that allows science producers and users to own the problem and set common goals together? How to deal with climate challenges pose for science communication? In this panel session, we seek to explore these questions through a debate on two-way communication channels involving scientists, practitioners and community users for improving understanding about how stakeholders perceive and respond to climate risks, as well as fostering bilateral cooperation for both the identification of knowledge gaps and dissemination of available knowledge. 

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