As part of the EU-funded PLACES project, a group of independent researchers from all over Europe developed The PLACES Toolkit for the Impact Assessment of SCIP (Science Communication Initiatives and Policies). Using it, 26 case studies were carried out. Results show that SCIP have several effects on publics (visitors and citizens), on those actors that took part in them (scientists, teachers, company representatives, journalists, politicians and centre staff), and on communities and cities where SCIP take place. On “publics”, SCIP strength group members’ ties, contribute to science “normalization”, and have cognitive and emotional impacts. With different results among case studies, this research shows that SCIP also inspire intellectual curiosity, increase self-esteem (when talking about science topics) and enhance scientific vocations. On “actors”, SCIP effects are specially focused on networking, a better understanding of audience needs and an improvement of professional skills. Local policies promoting science culture are perceived by main stakeholders (in their quality of observers) as having an important role in the city and community regarding its economic development and visibility. Citizens perceive science museums and science events as important symbols of their cities, especially in the context of what they imagine is a “city of scientific culture”. Results from these studies have served as a basis for a document of recommendations for the European Commission and all those in charge of carrying out initiatives and policies in the field of science communication and scientific culture.   

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Public Communication of Science and Technology

 

Impact of science communication on publics, cities and actors

Gema Revuelta   Universitat Pompeu Fabra

As part of the EU-funded PLACES project, a group of independent researchers from all over Europe developed The PLACES Toolkit for the Impact Assessment of SCIP (Science Communication Initiatives and Policies). Using it, 26 case studies were carried out. Results show that SCIP have several effects on publics (visitors and citizens), on those actors that took part in them (scientists, teachers, company representatives, journalists, politicians and centre staff), and on communities and cities where SCIP take place. On “publics”, SCIP strength group members’ ties, contribute to science “normalization”, and have cognitive and emotional impacts. With different results among case studies, this research shows that SCIP also inspire intellectual curiosity, increase self-esteem (when talking about science topics) and enhance scientific vocations. On “actors”, SCIP effects are specially focused on networking, a better understanding of audience needs and an improvement of professional skills. Local policies promoting science culture are perceived by main stakeholders (in their quality of observers) as having an important role in the city and community regarding its economic development and visibility. Citizens perceive science museums and science events as important symbols of their cities, especially in the context of what they imagine is a “city of scientific culture”. Results from these studies have served as a basis for a document of recommendations for the European Commission and all those in charge of carrying out initiatives and policies in the field of science communication and scientific culture.   

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