Science and technology in modern India, cannot be discussed without referring to the discourse which is rooted in the debate initiated by the first Prime Minister of India, Pandit Jawaharlal Nehru (1947-1964). The policy documents that followed, were Scientific Policy Resolution (SPR-1958), Technology Policy Statement (TPS-1983), Science and Technology Policy (STP-2003) and Science, Technology and Innovation Policy (STI-2013). These documents envisioned, articulated and codified aspirations, objectives and strategies to mark the role of science and technology in the nation building.

 First three decades after independence saw enlargement of infrastructure in terms of establishment of series of laboratories and facilities to generate S&T knowledge. Every document had emphasized the need to reach out the lay public and spread scientific awareness. The policy to popularise science and technology and foster scientific temper among masses, translated in establishment of institutions such as National Council of Science Museum (NCSM), National Council for Science and Technology Communication (NCSTC), National Institute of Science Communication and Research (NISCAIR) and Vigyn Prasar (VP). Each province was encouraged and financially supported by the central government to establish councils and departments with focus on promotion and popularisation of science and technology.

 The Non-Governmental Organisations (NGO) also played a very important role in taking science to the people. The pioneering NGOs which during their initial phases were individual initiative grew into large institutions. NGOs like Kerala Shastra Sahitya Parishad (KSSP), Akhil Bhartiya Andh Shradha Nirmulan Samiti, Marathi Vidnyan Parishad, NCSTC-Network, Karnataka Rajya Vijnana Parishat, Bharat Jan Vigyan Jatha, Science Centre, (Gwalior)  Madhya Pradesh (M.P.) etc., regularly popularised science among large sections of society.  

The notion of ‘scientific-temper’ has to be fostered relentlessly to keep the social ethos in sync with modern scientific knowledge. The policy frame-work of science and technology in India enunciated from time to time has continuously empowered the stakeholders including people to intensify the science popularisation.  

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Public Communication of Science and Technology

 

Science communication in India
Policy framework

Bhanu Pratap Singh   Scientist G and Head National council for Science and Technology Communication (NCSTC-division) Department of Science and Technology, New Delhi

Science and technology in modern India, cannot be discussed without referring to the discourse which is rooted in the debate initiated by the first Prime Minister of India, Pandit Jawaharlal Nehru (1947-1964). The policy documents that followed, were Scientific Policy Resolution (SPR-1958), Technology Policy Statement (TPS-1983), Science and Technology Policy (STP-2003) and Science, Technology and Innovation Policy (STI-2013). These documents envisioned, articulated and codified aspirations, objectives and strategies to mark the role of science and technology in the nation building.

 First three decades after independence saw enlargement of infrastructure in terms of establishment of series of laboratories and facilities to generate S&T knowledge. Every document had emphasized the need to reach out the lay public and spread scientific awareness. The policy to popularise science and technology and foster scientific temper among masses, translated in establishment of institutions such as National Council of Science Museum (NCSM), National Council for Science and Technology Communication (NCSTC), National Institute of Science Communication and Research (NISCAIR) and Vigyn Prasar (VP). Each province was encouraged and financially supported by the central government to establish councils and departments with focus on promotion and popularisation of science and technology.

 The Non-Governmental Organisations (NGO) also played a very important role in taking science to the people. The pioneering NGOs which during their initial phases were individual initiative grew into large institutions. NGOs like Kerala Shastra Sahitya Parishad (KSSP), Akhil Bhartiya Andh Shradha Nirmulan Samiti, Marathi Vidnyan Parishad, NCSTC-Network, Karnataka Rajya Vijnana Parishat, Bharat Jan Vigyan Jatha, Science Centre, (Gwalior)  Madhya Pradesh (M.P.) etc., regularly popularised science among large sections of society.  

The notion of ‘scientific-temper’ has to be fostered relentlessly to keep the social ethos in sync with modern scientific knowledge. The policy frame-work of science and technology in India enunciated from time to time has continuously empowered the stakeholders including people to intensify the science popularisation.  

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