Events are perceived as an effective means to attract people and initiate high levels of interactivity (Whelan & Wohlfeil, 2006). Nolin, Bragesjo and Kasperowski (2006) noted that science weeks and festivals are recent initiatives in the PUS landscape. Science events themselves are not new, the “newness” relates primarily to how the events are organized. Drawing from literature on marketing and science communication, results of a preliminary student research project, and experience in organizing “new style” science events, this paper will elaborate on the importance of science-image, event-image, and self-image congruence. As Keller (1993) indicated, science communication traditionally focuses on meeting cognitive needs, this cognitive part is composed of awareness and image. Branding in general, and event-marketing in this case specifically, may serve both purposes more effectively than some other modes of communication. Stepping into the footsteps of the global brands, the authors want to discuss the possibilities for using similar strategies for event marketing in science communication contexts, while paying mind to lessons learned about the importance of congruence. The authors have been involved as researchers and/or organizers in national and international science events and festivals (e.g. the BioPOP festival in Italy and the Netherlands; and the Discovery Festival in the Netherlands, part of European Researchers Night).

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Public Communication of Science and Technology

 

Events as science communication tool
The importance of exhilaration, involvement, and interaction

Julian Kleijn   The Hague University of Applied Sciences

Alex Verkade   The Hague University of Applied Sciences

Mark Bos   The Hague University of Applied Sciences

Events are perceived as an effective means to attract people and initiate high levels of interactivity (Whelan & Wohlfeil, 2006). Nolin, Bragesjo and Kasperowski (2006) noted that science weeks and festivals are recent initiatives in the PUS landscape. Science events themselves are not new, the “newness” relates primarily to how the events are organized. Drawing from literature on marketing and science communication, results of a preliminary student research project, and experience in organizing “new style” science events, this paper will elaborate on the importance of science-image, event-image, and self-image congruence. As Keller (1993) indicated, science communication traditionally focuses on meeting cognitive needs, this cognitive part is composed of awareness and image. Branding in general, and event-marketing in this case specifically, may serve both purposes more effectively than some other modes of communication. Stepping into the footsteps of the global brands, the authors want to discuss the possibilities for using similar strategies for event marketing in science communication contexts, while paying mind to lessons learned about the importance of congruence. The authors have been involved as researchers and/or organizers in national and international science events and festivals (e.g. the BioPOP festival in Italy and the Netherlands; and the Discovery Festival in the Netherlands, part of European Researchers Night).

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