South Asia comprises the countries of Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Nepal, Pakistan, the Maldives, and Sri Lanka. This study on climate change has been carried out by (1) analyzing the newspaper texts available online, and (2) interviewing journalists of South Asia through emails. Global climate change is now a major challenge facing the world. The UN‟s Inter-governmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) and other leading organizations have expressed their concerns over climate change being cause in terms of erratic monsoons, flash floods, crop failure, etc. The South Asian region is more vulnerable to climate change risks as it is too dependent on its natural resources and agriculture, besides its dense population and poverty. This paper focused on studying the discourses of the climate change-related news in newspapers of the South Asian countries. It was found that there is a phenomenal difference in attitudes and experiences of journalists in bringing out the information to the public domain. Some of the other findings are: The journalists mostly portray climate change as cause of anthropogenic activities and climate change as a potential crisis in near future. There needs to be more media focus at the regional or local levels. Climate change will not affect every place on the earth in the same way. Thus, specific solution strategies may need to be developed for regional areas. Although climate change effects will be felt at national and global levels, there are regional adaptations that need to be considered. For this, journalists will have to work hand in hand with grassroots civil society activists to create climate awareness at the local level. There is a possibility that journalistic behaviour could affect the way that the media presents climate change. Matters such as deadlines and lack of knowledge of the reporters could result in heavy use of material from international and national news agency services. It might be expected that a regional newspaper would provide a greater amount of regional and local coverage, but it is not the case. Regarding methodology, it was difficult to access major newspapers over the internet for analyzing the content, though archives were available in most of the news portals. Accessing journalists and getting interviews over email was more difficult.

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Newspaper coverage of climate change in South Asia

Arul Aram   Anna University

South Asia comprises the countries of Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Nepal, Pakistan, the Maldives, and Sri Lanka. This study on climate change has been carried out by (1) analyzing the newspaper texts available online, and (2) interviewing journalists of South Asia through emails. Global climate change is now a major challenge facing the world. The UN‟s Inter-governmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) and other leading organizations have expressed their concerns over climate change being cause in terms of erratic monsoons, flash floods, crop failure, etc. The South Asian region is more vulnerable to climate change risks as it is too dependent on its natural resources and agriculture, besides its dense population and poverty. This paper focused on studying the discourses of the climate change-related news in newspapers of the South Asian countries. It was found that there is a phenomenal difference in attitudes and experiences of journalists in bringing out the information to the public domain. Some of the other findings are: The journalists mostly portray climate change as cause of anthropogenic activities and climate change as a potential crisis in near future. There needs to be more media focus at the regional or local levels. Climate change will not affect every place on the earth in the same way. Thus, specific solution strategies may need to be developed for regional areas. Although climate change effects will be felt at national and global levels, there are regional adaptations that need to be considered. For this, journalists will have to work hand in hand with grassroots civil society activists to create climate awareness at the local level. There is a possibility that journalistic behaviour could affect the way that the media presents climate change. Matters such as deadlines and lack of knowledge of the reporters could result in heavy use of material from international and national news agency services. It might be expected that a regional newspaper would provide a greater amount of regional and local coverage, but it is not the case. Regarding methodology, it was difficult to access major newspapers over the internet for analyzing the content, though archives were available in most of the news portals. Accessing journalists and getting interviews over email was more difficult.

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