The Universidad Veracruzana launched in 2013 a certificate program focusing on science communication. The purpose was to bring the socio-cultural domain into a highlight position when preparing science communication strategies in order to create not only bridges between scientists and society, but also to ensure to support citizens' needs with available scientific knowledge. The educational menu offered three areas of concentration: science journalism, multimedia production and face-to-face strategies. The curricular design was rooted in the principles of participatory approaches and experiential learning. On the one hand, the objective was to blend theoretical content with practical experience in order to have a direct interaction with different types of audiences. This resulted in the construction of a science communication perspective that took them beyond statistical data and allowed them to appropriate a view of reality and the characterization of audiences within their projects. Concurrently to this learning process and having such a heterogeneous group, classes were facilitated with participatory approaches to create awareness of their differences and similarities when discussing science communication conceptualizations. As a common identity as science communicators was constructed, students were exposed to a final project where they worked in contexts that were professionally or personally relevant to them. Their science communication strategies captured their learning process when they expressed in them, elements of intellectual, social or emotional engagement.

">
 [PCST]
PCST Network

Public Communication of Science and Technology

 

Exploring lessons from the implementation of a regional educational program on public communication of science in Mexico

Valentina Martínez-Valdés   Universidad Veracruzana

María Portilla   Universidad Veracruzana

Manuel Morales   Universidad Veracruzana

The Universidad Veracruzana launched in 2013 a certificate program focusing on science communication. The purpose was to bring the socio-cultural domain into a highlight position when preparing science communication strategies in order to create not only bridges between scientists and society, but also to ensure to support citizens' needs with available scientific knowledge. The educational menu offered three areas of concentration: science journalism, multimedia production and face-to-face strategies. The curricular design was rooted in the principles of participatory approaches and experiential learning. On the one hand, the objective was to blend theoretical content with practical experience in order to have a direct interaction with different types of audiences. This resulted in the construction of a science communication perspective that took them beyond statistical data and allowed them to appropriate a view of reality and the characterization of audiences within their projects. Concurrently to this learning process and having such a heterogeneous group, classes were facilitated with participatory approaches to create awareness of their differences and similarities when discussing science communication conceptualizations. As a common identity as science communicators was constructed, students were exposed to a final project where they worked in contexts that were professionally or personally relevant to them. Their science communication strategies captured their learning process when they expressed in them, elements of intellectual, social or emotional engagement.

[PDF 0.00]Download the full paper (PDF 0.00)

BACK TO TOP