This work addresses the particulars of scientific blogging in the Brazilian scientific context. It draws on an overall analysis of 105 Brazilian scientific blogs, using a variety of criteria such as the blogger’s credentials and the blog institutional bond, frequency and length of postings, editorial guidelines, explicit target public, as well as the use of some web design tools. Such an analysis allows us to raise questions around the impact of the blog institutional bond over the frequency and volume of posts, e.g. why press vehicles scientific blogs face quantity problems in publishing and frequency, which are very similar to those faced by any fulltime university professor. As literature points out to the generalized problem of constant feeding of content that is prone to be found (at least in principle) in blogs and other more decentralized forms of publishing, we argue for what seems to be a more promising framework that goes beyond the focus on the interactive possibilities of blogs and opens up space to question daily professional routines and specific scientific publication culture in Brazil compared to other countries.

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Public Communication of Science and Technology

 

Science Blogging
Some particulars of the contemporary Brazilian scenario

Juliana Botelho   Centro de Comunicação da Universidade

Luiza Carvalho   Centro de Comunicação da Universidade

Rachel Gomes   Centro de Comunicação da Universidade

This work addresses the particulars of scientific blogging in the Brazilian scientific context. It draws on an overall analysis of 105 Brazilian scientific blogs, using a variety of criteria such as the blogger’s credentials and the blog institutional bond, frequency and length of postings, editorial guidelines, explicit target public, as well as the use of some web design tools. Such an analysis allows us to raise questions around the impact of the blog institutional bond over the frequency and volume of posts, e.g. why press vehicles scientific blogs face quantity problems in publishing and frequency, which are very similar to those faced by any fulltime university professor. As literature points out to the generalized problem of constant feeding of content that is prone to be found (at least in principle) in blogs and other more decentralized forms of publishing, we argue for what seems to be a more promising framework that goes beyond the focus on the interactive possibilities of blogs and opens up space to question daily professional routines and specific scientific publication culture in Brazil compared to other countries.

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