This presentation is based on preliminary data from my ongoing doctoral research, which discusses values and practices of science journalism (SC) in Argentina. Theory and empirical work on this topic has been dominated by Anglo-Saxon studies, including classic (Nelkin, 1995; Bauer & Bucchi, 2007; Gregory & Miller, 1998) and contemporary studies (Amend & Secko, 2012; Schäfer, 2011; Jensen, 2010; Hansen, 2009). Important work has been produced in Latin America and Argentina (Ramalho et. al., 2012; Cortassa, 2012; Castrillón, 2011; Massarani, 2007) but further and systematic inquiry is needed to contextualise reported findings elsewhere. It is often suggested that SJ carries out a positive and condescending tone towards scientific knowledge, lack of skepticism and context in information treatment, homogenous news agendas and certain “complicity” between journalists and experts that put in risk the independence and autonomy of the mass media. I seek to explore and problematise this characterisation by analysing potential tensions between values and practices of journalists to understand the development of this profession in Argentina. An initial hypothesis is that journalists’ working conditions, academic background, career and professional experience, and the designed and self-perceived role as professionals can be used to understand their work and the content they produce. What tensions exist between values and practices of professional journalism in relation to scientific knowledge? How do journalists think of themselves? What characterises SJ in the Argentinean press? The empirical approach points to semi-structured and in-depth interviews with Argentinean science journalists and news analysis in national broadsheet newspapers using an adapted version of a protocol designed by the Ibero American Network for Monitoring and Training if Science Journalism (Ramalho et.al., 2012) and the “Table of Citizen Interests” developed at the National Autonomous University of Mexico. Theoretical framework includes science communication studies (especially on science news and SJ), sociology of news and field theory and social practices by Pierre Bourdieu. Finally, results of preliminary fieldwork will be discussed, which consisted in interviewing experienced professional science journalists (working in the US and Europe) during the 8th World Conference of Science Journalists.

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Science journalism in Argentina
An analysis of practices and values of journalists in the print media

Cecilia Rosen   Centro Redes/ Faculdade Latino-Americana de Ciências Sociais

This presentation is based on preliminary data from my ongoing doctoral research, which discusses values and practices of science journalism (SC) in Argentina. Theory and empirical work on this topic has been dominated by Anglo-Saxon studies, including classic (Nelkin, 1995; Bauer & Bucchi, 2007; Gregory & Miller, 1998) and contemporary studies (Amend & Secko, 2012; Schäfer, 2011; Jensen, 2010; Hansen, 2009). Important work has been produced in Latin America and Argentina (Ramalho et. al., 2012; Cortassa, 2012; Castrillón, 2011; Massarani, 2007) but further and systematic inquiry is needed to contextualise reported findings elsewhere. It is often suggested that SJ carries out a positive and condescending tone towards scientific knowledge, lack of skepticism and context in information treatment, homogenous news agendas and certain “complicity” between journalists and experts that put in risk the independence and autonomy of the mass media. I seek to explore and problematise this characterisation by analysing potential tensions between values and practices of journalists to understand the development of this profession in Argentina. An initial hypothesis is that journalists’ working conditions, academic background, career and professional experience, and the designed and self-perceived role as professionals can be used to understand their work and the content they produce. What tensions exist between values and practices of professional journalism in relation to scientific knowledge? How do journalists think of themselves? What characterises SJ in the Argentinean press? The empirical approach points to semi-structured and in-depth interviews with Argentinean science journalists and news analysis in national broadsheet newspapers using an adapted version of a protocol designed by the Ibero American Network for Monitoring and Training if Science Journalism (Ramalho et.al., 2012) and the “Table of Citizen Interests” developed at the National Autonomous University of Mexico. Theoretical framework includes science communication studies (especially on science news and SJ), sociology of news and field theory and social practices by Pierre Bourdieu. Finally, results of preliminary fieldwork will be discussed, which consisted in interviewing experienced professional science journalists (working in the US and Europe) during the 8th World Conference of Science Journalists.

A copy of the full paper has not yet been submitted.

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