Genetic engineering has  given rise  to  extreme reactions from people  with opposing perspectives. This was  highlighted  in  1997  when  the  cloning  of  ‘Dolly’  was  announced.  There  are  a  number  scientific investigations  that  are  provoking  ethical  questions  such  as  genetically  engineered  food, xenotransplantation,  and  assisted  reproductive  techniques.  The  aim  of  this  study  is  to  investigate  the interpretation, transfer and exchange of information between groups interested in applications arising from such technologies.

The  genetically  engineered  sugar  beet  plant,  developed  by  Monsanto,  has  provided  an  excellent  case study in the Republic of Ireland. The field trial conducted by Monsanto in 1997 provided the stimulus for numerous public debates and regular press coverage.

The  research  investigates  how  key  parties  explore  and  discuss  issues  arising  from  the  application  of biotechnology, and how they formulate and promote their policies.

The  communication  channels  utilised  and  perhaps  established  as  a  result  of  the  increasing  debate  on biotechnology have provided a  model/framework on  which to  compare data  from the  Republic of  Ireland and Northern Ireland.

Initial   results   show   that   there   are   many   different   levels   of   communication,   translation   and dissemination  of  information  in  the  public  sphere  and  an  obvious  variation  between  the  Republic  of Ireland and Northern Ireland.
 


 


 


 


 

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 [PCST]
PCST Network

Public Communication of Science and Technology

 

Communicating ethical issues arising from biotechnology
In the republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland

Fiona Barbagallo   Dublin City University School of Communications

Genetic engineering has  given rise  to  extreme reactions from people  with opposing perspectives. This was  highlighted  in  1997  when  the  cloning  of  ‘Dolly’  was  announced.  There  are  a  number  scientific investigations  that  are  provoking  ethical  questions  such  as  genetically  engineered  food, xenotransplantation,  and  assisted  reproductive  techniques.  The  aim  of  this  study  is  to  investigate  the interpretation, transfer and exchange of information between groups interested in applications arising from such technologies.

The  genetically  engineered  sugar  beet  plant,  developed  by  Monsanto,  has  provided  an  excellent  case study in the Republic of Ireland. The field trial conducted by Monsanto in 1997 provided the stimulus for numerous public debates and regular press coverage.

The  research  investigates  how  key  parties  explore  and  discuss  issues  arising  from  the  application  of biotechnology, and how they formulate and promote their policies.

The  communication  channels  utilised  and  perhaps  established  as  a  result  of  the  increasing  debate  on biotechnology have provided a  model/framework on  which to  compare data  from the  Republic of  Ireland and Northern Ireland.

Initial   results   show   that   there   are   many   different   levels   of   communication,   translation   and dissemination  of  information  in  the  public  sphere  and  an  obvious  variation  between  the  Republic  of Ireland and Northern Ireland.
 


 


 


 


 

A copy of the full paper has not yet been submitted.

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