When considering scientific concepts, history, culture, economy and other minor but not less important circumstances must be taken into account. Scientific citizenship is a complex term, often used in ways that give diverse messages, which sometimes lose connection to the original meaning, or worse, they are void. Most laymen on the subject would remain silent when asked about it, or would ask what it is all about. Uruguay is a good sample to test which beliefs and values surround this modern concept, considering it’s a developing country that is experiencing a recognizable economic growth and has increased its investment in science, technology and innovation in the last 10 to 15 years. This increase in public spending has settled on a new phase for science and science communication in Uruguay. This presentation is based on 10 semi-structured interviews, in which we asked, together with other introductory and complementary questions, personal thoughts, associations and ideas when considering the term “scientific citizenship”. The 10 people interviewed are representatives from the science communication arena and have long trajectories in different activities that may contribute to the country’s scientific citizenship and at the same time, sense the state of the art of science communication in Uruguay. We will present some of the developed views and analyze the common points and differences. Do they correspond with the activities they carry on or the institutions their work in? Are these views just personal, maybe Uruguay-shaped or do they follow a common trend with the rest of the world? The answers to these questions should be ideally discussed with the public at the PCST conference, so we will do our best to achieve participation after our presentation. We also have our own ideas and doubts to present and discuss, as we are searching for clues to strengthen scientific citizenship in Uruguay and make science communication effective and worth it. Our aim is to contribute to a critical approach and social liability in the universe of science communication activities.

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Public Communication of Science and Technology

 

Scientific citizenship
A Utopia?
Interdisciplinary views from Uruguay

Rocio Paulino   Universidad de la República

When considering scientific concepts, history, culture, economy and other minor but not less important circumstances must be taken into account. Scientific citizenship is a complex term, often used in ways that give diverse messages, which sometimes lose connection to the original meaning, or worse, they are void. Most laymen on the subject would remain silent when asked about it, or would ask what it is all about. Uruguay is a good sample to test which beliefs and values surround this modern concept, considering it’s a developing country that is experiencing a recognizable economic growth and has increased its investment in science, technology and innovation in the last 10 to 15 years. This increase in public spending has settled on a new phase for science and science communication in Uruguay. This presentation is based on 10 semi-structured interviews, in which we asked, together with other introductory and complementary questions, personal thoughts, associations and ideas when considering the term “scientific citizenship”. The 10 people interviewed are representatives from the science communication arena and have long trajectories in different activities that may contribute to the country’s scientific citizenship and at the same time, sense the state of the art of science communication in Uruguay. We will present some of the developed views and analyze the common points and differences. Do they correspond with the activities they carry on or the institutions their work in? Are these views just personal, maybe Uruguay-shaped or do they follow a common trend with the rest of the world? The answers to these questions should be ideally discussed with the public at the PCST conference, so we will do our best to achieve participation after our presentation. We also have our own ideas and doubts to present and discuss, as we are searching for clues to strengthen scientific citizenship in Uruguay and make science communication effective and worth it. Our aim is to contribute to a critical approach and social liability in the universe of science communication activities.

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