The presentation will report on the media and public coverage of the email controversy which involved climate scientists and was largely reported as a huge scientific scandal (it was dubbed Climategate by the media). On 19 November 2009, thousands of e-mails and other documents sent by researchers from the Climate Research Unit of the University of East Anglia appeared on a public website. The controversy came from the fact that some emails were interpreted as showing that researchers manipulated raw data, hide climate information or influenced the peer-review process in order to make the case for global warming appear stronger than it is. In July 2010, several independent reviews rejected allegations that climate scientists had colluded to manipulate scientific information, but the researchers involved and their institution were criticized for a culture of withholding information. The presentation will focus on the key lessons that can be drawn from this case for the public communication of science.

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Public Communication of Science and Technology

 

Symposium
Communicating climate change in the media With lessons from Climategate:Climategate
What's in it for science communicators?

Michel Claessens   Communication unit, Directorate-General for Research European Commission

The presentation will report on the media and public coverage of the email controversy which involved climate scientists and was largely reported as a huge scientific scandal (it was dubbed Climategate by the media). On 19 November 2009, thousands of e-mails and other documents sent by researchers from the Climate Research Unit of the University of East Anglia appeared on a public website. The controversy came from the fact that some emails were interpreted as showing that researchers manipulated raw data, hide climate information or influenced the peer-review process in order to make the case for global warming appear stronger than it is. In July 2010, several independent reviews rejected allegations that climate scientists had colluded to manipulate scientific information, but the researchers involved and their institution were criticized for a culture of withholding information. The presentation will focus on the key lessons that can be drawn from this case for the public communication of science.

A copy of the full paper has not yet been submitted.

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