“Do you standby?” is a video-art that was produced and disseminated through social networks. Videos have become a popular approach to transmit varied environmental and scientific issues but a proper evaluation of its effectiveness is usually lacking. The “Do You Stand By?” project aims to overcome that shortcoming and at the same time to trigger a reflexive learning process in a wide audience which could, in turn, induce a behavior change regarding the standby use of energy.
 
The video-art “Do you standby?” was disseminated through social networks such as YouTube and Facebook during two months. It was followed by a short questionnaire on energy issues and on the video itself. This methodology, using a video (2 min.) and a questionnaire (2 min.) was an attempt to both assess the video’s effectiveness and to increase people’s awareness, hopefully able to activate self-questioning and self evaluation, triggering a reflection process which could induce a change of behavior.When people are answering the questionnaire after watching the video, they reflect once more on the issue, rethink their current behavior and the need to change. We also tried to understand how people reacted to the video, and how the message came across, namely if people became willing to change their behavior regarding standby. Reflexive learning was used as a motivating framing concept to draw the video script and formulate the questionnaire.
 
Using a universal language and using social networks reached a wide and varied audience. Results from 1000 answers (in two months) to the questionnaire show some insights into people’s awareness regarding standby power consumption and the usefulness of videos as a communication tool. The majority of comments obtained in the questionnaire showed that the video was received as an enjoyable and motivating experience. We obtained a very positive feedback about the use of video-art as a tool for communicating environmental messages, as well as a trigger to foster reflexive learning and subsequent behavior change.
 
The paper discusses this environmental communication project aimed at understanding the suitability of using video-art to convey scientific/environmental issues and encouraging sustainable energy use in the field of stand-by energy consumption. The experience gathered and the results obtained in this project act as an inspiration that can be repeated with other more demanding subjects.
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Public Communication of Science and Technology

 

Do you standby?
The use of video in communicating environment

Sofia Guedes Vaz   CENSE/FCT/UNL (New University of Lisbon)Sofia

Rita Lopes   CENSE/ FCT/UNL (New University of Lisbon)

Pedro Beça   CENSE/FCT/UNL (New University of Lisbon)

Vanja Karadzic   CENSE/FCT/UNL (New University of Lisbon)

Winston Jerónimo   CENSE/FCT/UNL (New University of Lisbon)

“Do you standby?” is a video-art that was produced and disseminated through social networks. Videos have become a popular approach to transmit varied environmental and scientific issues but a proper evaluation of its effectiveness is usually lacking. The “Do You Stand By?” project aims to overcome that shortcoming and at the same time to trigger a reflexive learning process in a wide audience which could, in turn, induce a behavior change regarding the standby use of energy.
 
The video-art “Do you standby?” was disseminated through social networks such as YouTube and Facebook during two months. It was followed by a short questionnaire on energy issues and on the video itself. This methodology, using a video (2 min.) and a questionnaire (2 min.) was an attempt to both assess the video’s effectiveness and to increase people’s awareness, hopefully able to activate self-questioning and self evaluation, triggering a reflection process which could induce a change of behavior.When people are answering the questionnaire after watching the video, they reflect once more on the issue, rethink their current behavior and the need to change. We also tried to understand how people reacted to the video, and how the message came across, namely if people became willing to change their behavior regarding standby. Reflexive learning was used as a motivating framing concept to draw the video script and formulate the questionnaire.
 
Using a universal language and using social networks reached a wide and varied audience. Results from 1000 answers (in two months) to the questionnaire show some insights into people’s awareness regarding standby power consumption and the usefulness of videos as a communication tool. The majority of comments obtained in the questionnaire showed that the video was received as an enjoyable and motivating experience. We obtained a very positive feedback about the use of video-art as a tool for communicating environmental messages, as well as a trigger to foster reflexive learning and subsequent behavior change.
 
The paper discusses this environmental communication project aimed at understanding the suitability of using video-art to convey scientific/environmental issues and encouraging sustainable energy use in the field of stand-by energy consumption. The experience gathered and the results obtained in this project act as an inspiration that can be repeated with other more demanding subjects.

A copy of the full paper has not yet been submitted.

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