In this session participants will receive a postcard from an allied communication professionals like, bloggers, philosophers, professors, and entertainers, etc. The postcard will provide a communication “insight”. The group will reply to the postcard with their experiences and examples of science communication. The wealth and diversity of PCST 12 participants should make this an exciting session. The session outcomes will be published on-line as a part of a project called Science Communication Postcards.
 
Sample postcard: Dear PCST 12, Hello “Socrates” here, I’ve thought about effective communication – I think the concept has three elements. It has logos (logic and sound argument): if it makes sense I listen. The second is ethos (the relationship the communicator constructs with the audience): if I like our “connection” I will continue to engage. The last of the 3 is pathos (the message also speaks to the heart): if it resonates with me, it’s meaningful. Have you experienced this too? Remember Wisdom begins in wonder. Enjoy your Italian sojourn. Love Socrates.
 
Sample response: Dear Socrates, Hello PCST12 group 2 here, we have some examples of science communication that illustrate you’re thinking. We saw an exhibit in ... And it was memorable because... Etc. 
 
The Science Communication Postcards project is intended to be a collection of case studies in science communication that can serve as a resource of concepts and creativity to science communicators around the world. The project was inspired by documenting an undergraduate Science Communication course at The University of Melbourne and my Science Communication Gym (training I run for scientists to communicate more effectively). It became apparent that creating effective communication meant access to a resource that connects “conceptual tools” (like Socrates logos, ethos and pathos) with good examples that made use of these tools in the everyday world.
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 [PCST]
PCST Network

Public Communication of Science and Technology

 

Science communication postcards

Andi Horvath   Museum Victoria, Melbourne, Australia

George Aranda   Deakin University

Science Communication Postcards
In this session participants will receive a postcard from an allied communication professionals like, bloggers, philosophers, professors, and entertainers, etc. The postcard will provide a communication “insight”. The group will reply to the postcard with their experiences and examples of science communication. The wealth and diversity of PCST 12 participants should make this an exciting session. The session outcomes will be published on-line as a part of a project called Science Communication Postcards.
 
Sample postcard: Dear PCST 12, Hello “Socrates” here, I’ve thought about effective communication – I think the concept has three elements. It has logos (logic and sound argument): if it makes sense I listen. The second is ethos (the relationship the communicator constructs with the audience): if I like our “connection” I will continue to engage. The last of the 3 is pathos (the message also speaks to the heart): if it resonates with me, it’s meaningful. Have you experienced this too? Remember Wisdom begins in wonder. Enjoy your Italian sojourn. Love Socrates.
 
Sample response: Dear Socrates, Hello PCST12 group 2 here, we have some examples of science communication that illustrate you’re thinking. We saw an exhibit in ... And it was memorable because... Etc. 
 
The Science Communication Postcards project is intended to be a collection of case studies in science communication that can serve as a resource of concepts and creativity to science communicators around the world. The project was inspired by documenting an undergraduate Science Communication course at The University of Melbourne and my Science Communication Gym (training I run for scientists to communicate more effectively). It became apparent that creating effective communication meant access to a resource that connects “conceptual tools” (like Socrates logos, ethos and pathos) with good examples that made use of these tools in the everyday world.

A copy of the full paper has not yet been submitted.

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