Hackerspaces, such as Karkhana Collective in Nepal, LifePatch (Citizen Initiative in Art, Science and Technology) and The House of Natural Fiber (HONF- Yogyakarta New Media Art Laboratory) in Indonesia, Manila Biopunk Movement in the Philippines or Sustainable Living Lab in Singapore are part of an informal research network, which supports communities through prototypes using open source hardware platforms. The convergence of ICTs with emergent biotechnologies, especially bioinformatics, has its counterpart in this alternative culture of circuit board customization and DIYbio hacking, which created some unique opportunities for research in the Global South. The OSHW hacking enabled the creation of cheap laboratory and citizen science equipment used
Indonesia, Nepal, and in various hackerspaces around the world. I will present case studies of how open hardware enables science communication in Indonesia and describe the networks behind OSHW. While the official biotech industry operates under the strict patent logic of the global biotech business, the emergent hackerspace movement explores alternative possibilities of doing science. It supports open licenses and open source approaches, which created conditions for community based research and development bringing closer policy and science, community building and prototype testing. The OSHW prototypes also open unique possibilities for interaction between traditional crafts and open science.

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Public Communication of Science and Technology

 

Supporting science communication with open source hardware(OSHW) in Asia
How can traditional crafts help open science?

Denisa Kera   National University Of Singapore

Hackerspaces, such as Karkhana Collective in Nepal, LifePatch (Citizen Initiative in Art, Science and Technology) and The House of Natural Fiber (HONF- Yogyakarta New Media Art Laboratory) in Indonesia, Manila Biopunk Movement in the Philippines or Sustainable Living Lab in Singapore are part of an informal research network, which supports communities through prototypes using open source hardware platforms. The convergence of ICTs with emergent biotechnologies, especially bioinformatics, has its counterpart in this alternative culture of circuit board customization and DIYbio hacking, which created some unique opportunities for research in the Global South. The OSHW hacking enabled the creation of cheap laboratory and citizen science equipment used
Indonesia, Nepal, and in various hackerspaces around the world. I will present case studies of how open hardware enables science communication in Indonesia and describe the networks behind OSHW. While the official biotech industry operates under the strict patent logic of the global biotech business, the emergent hackerspace movement explores alternative possibilities of doing science. It supports open licenses and open source approaches, which created conditions for community based research and development bringing closer policy and science, community building and prototype testing. The OSHW prototypes also open unique possibilities for interaction between traditional crafts and open science.

A copy of the full paper has not yet been submitted.

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