Studies have shown that university professors and public sector scientists are regarded by various stakeholders as highly credible, trustworthy, and key information sources on biotechnology. They are seen to be highly concerned about public health and safety issues and are deemed capable of assessing and managing benefits and risks. They can play an important role in enabling a transparent and evidence-based discussion of issues and concerns that affect understanding, acceptance, and adoption of biotechnology. While developed countries such as Europe and North America have institutional mechanisms to encourage public engagement with science, it has not been the same for experts in Asia. What is the status of biotech experts in developing countries with regards their awareness and application of science communication? This paper presents highlights of a three- country study on Academics and Scientists as Biotechnology Communicators: Perspectives, Capabilities, and Challenges of Experts in Asia. The study seeks to find out how academics and scientists in Indonesia, Malaysia, and the Philippines are fulfilling their role as biotech communicators with the public. Specifically, it focuses on science communication activities, communication needs, and mechanisms to address concerns. Recommendations are forwarded to develop a favorable environment for science communication in developing countries.

">
 [PCST]
PCST Network

Public Communication of Science and Technology

 

Do Asian biotech experts communicate with the public?

Mariechel Navarro   International Service for the Acquisition of Agri- Biotech Applications, Philippines

Kristine Tome   International Service for the Acquisition of Agri-Biotech Applications, Philippines

Rhodora Aldemita   International Service for the Acquisition of Agri-Biotech Applications, Philippines

Studies have shown that university professors and public sector scientists are regarded by various stakeholders as highly credible, trustworthy, and key information sources on biotechnology. They are seen to be highly concerned about public health and safety issues and are deemed capable of assessing and managing benefits and risks. They can play an important role in enabling a transparent and evidence-based discussion of issues and concerns that affect understanding, acceptance, and adoption of biotechnology. While developed countries such as Europe and North America have institutional mechanisms to encourage public engagement with science, it has not been the same for experts in Asia. What is the status of biotech experts in developing countries with regards their awareness and application of science communication? This paper presents highlights of a three- country study on Academics and Scientists as Biotechnology Communicators: Perspectives, Capabilities, and Challenges of Experts in Asia. The study seeks to find out how academics and scientists in Indonesia, Malaysia, and the Philippines are fulfilling their role as biotech communicators with the public. Specifically, it focuses on science communication activities, communication needs, and mechanisms to address concerns. Recommendations are forwarded to develop a favorable environment for science communication in developing countries.

A copy of the full paper has not yet been submitted.

BACK TO TOP