The Universidad Veracruzana launched in 2013 a certificate program focusing on science communication groundwork in attempt to propose a scholar vision incorporating an inclusive social approach. The purpose was to bring the sociocultural domain into a highlight position when preparing science communication strategies in order to create not only bridges between scientists and society, but also to ensure to support citizens‘ needs with available scientific knowledge. The program gathered professionals from a wide range of areas, from science teachers, reporters, as well as different science researchers. The educational menu offered three areas of concentration: science journalism, multimedia production and face-to-face strategies. The curricular design was rooted in the principles of participatory approaches and experiential learning. On the one hand, the objective was to blend theoretical content with practical experience in order to have a direct interaction with different types of publics. This was intended so as to have a sensibilitazion process for the students that could enable them to experience from first hand what is the meaning of geographical and social differences of local publics. This direct contact resulted in the construction of a science communication perspective that took them beyond statistical data and allowed them to appropiate a view of reality and the characterization of publics within their projects. Concurrently to this learning process and having such an heterogenous group, classes were facilitated with participatory approaches to create awareness of their differences and similarities when discussing science communication conceptualizations. As a common identity as science communicators was constructed, students were exposed to a final project where they worked in contexts that were profesionally or personally relevant to them.

Their science communication strategies captured their learning process when they expressed in them, elements of intelectual, social or emotional engagement. Thus, this program is an effort to examine new possibilities not only in the sense to propose an educational program with social pertinence, but also to explore creative ways to teach science communication. Expectantly, this will contribute to the disciplinary formation of professionals empowered to feel more as citizens and, in turn, have citizens feeling acknowledged.

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Public Communication of Science and Technology

 

Exploring lessons from the implementation of a regional program on public communication of science in Mexico

Valentina Valdés   CITRO - Universidad Veracruzana, Mexico

María Portilla   Laboratorio Multimedia X Balam - Universidad Veracruzana, Mexico

Manuel Morales   Departamento de Inteligencia Artificial - Universidad Veracruzana, Mexico

The Universidad Veracruzana launched in 2013 a certificate program focusing on science communication groundwork in attempt to propose a scholar vision incorporating an inclusive social approach. The purpose was to bring the sociocultural domain into a highlight position when preparing science communication strategies in order to create not only bridges between scientists and society, but also to ensure to support citizens‘ needs with available scientific knowledge. The program gathered professionals from a wide range of areas, from science teachers, reporters, as well as different science researchers. The educational menu offered three areas of concentration: science journalism, multimedia production and face-to-face strategies. The curricular design was rooted in the principles of participatory approaches and experiential learning. On the one hand, the objective was to blend theoretical content with practical experience in order to have a direct interaction with different types of publics. This was intended so as to have a sensibilitazion process for the students that could enable them to experience from first hand what is the meaning of geographical and social differences of local publics. This direct contact resulted in the construction of a science communication perspective that took them beyond statistical data and allowed them to appropiate a view of reality and the characterization of publics within their projects. Concurrently to this learning process and having such an heterogenous group, classes were facilitated with participatory approaches to create awareness of their differences and similarities when discussing science communication conceptualizations. As a common identity as science communicators was constructed, students were exposed to a final project where they worked in contexts that were profesionally or personally relevant to them.

Their science communication strategies captured their learning process when they expressed in them, elements of intelectual, social or emotional engagement. Thus, this program is an effort to examine new possibilities not only in the sense to propose an educational program with social pertinence, but also to explore creative ways to teach science communication. Expectantly, this will contribute to the disciplinary formation of professionals empowered to feel more as citizens and, in turn, have citizens feeling acknowledged.

A copy of the full paper has not yet been submitted.

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