‘If a solution is to speak to a people and not end up as the private answer of a sect, it needs to find roots in their life, language and thought’ (Campbell, 1974 *) The context for this paper is the uncontrolled explosive growth of global whale watching and the failure of widespread sustainable practices. Economic imperatives and environmental marketing have driven the global growth of whale watching in both developing and developed world. The widespread failure of sustainability is, in part, due to ineffective public communication and poor uptake of science related to impact assessments of whale watching. This paper calls for the need to raise new questions relating to the efficacy of science and the urgent need to improve science communication to address the failure of collaboration between whale watch stakeholders. The paper presents a new science advocacy communication framework for the whale watching setting drawing on elements of documentary filmmaking such as storytelling with techniques used in TV Commercials and viral videos to frame and communicate scientific information. This audiovisual Science Communication Commercial or short SciCommercial presents a potential management tool for the whale watching industry by advocating sustainable practices to stakeholders (including governing bodies and local whale watch communities), increasing public awareness about impacts and managing visitor’s expectations. The paper will outline the developed science communication framework and present the produced multimedia whale watching SciCommercial research tool. While focusing on sustainable whale watching as the case study of this paper the SciCommercial communication framework presents an effective tool for wider science communication. * Campbell, J. A. (1974). Charles Darwin and the crisis of ecology: A rhetorical perspective, Quarterly Journal of Speech, 60(4), 442-449.

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Public Communication of Science and Technology

 

Save the whales part ii
A new science advocacy communication framework

Wiebke Finkler   University of Otago, New Zealand

‘If a solution is to speak to a people and not end up as the private answer of a sect, it needs to find roots in their life, language and thought’ (Campbell, 1974 *) The context for this paper is the uncontrolled explosive growth of global whale watching and the failure of widespread sustainable practices. Economic imperatives and environmental marketing have driven the global growth of whale watching in both developing and developed world. The widespread failure of sustainability is, in part, due to ineffective public communication and poor uptake of science related to impact assessments of whale watching. This paper calls for the need to raise new questions relating to the efficacy of science and the urgent need to improve science communication to address the failure of collaboration between whale watch stakeholders. The paper presents a new science advocacy communication framework for the whale watching setting drawing on elements of documentary filmmaking such as storytelling with techniques used in TV Commercials and viral videos to frame and communicate scientific information. This audiovisual Science Communication Commercial or short SciCommercial presents a potential management tool for the whale watching industry by advocating sustainable practices to stakeholders (including governing bodies and local whale watch communities), increasing public awareness about impacts and managing visitor’s expectations. The paper will outline the developed science communication framework and present the produced multimedia whale watching SciCommercial research tool. While focusing on sustainable whale watching as the case study of this paper the SciCommercial communication framework presents an effective tool for wider science communication. * Campbell, J. A. (1974). Charles Darwin and the crisis of ecology: A rhetorical perspective, Quarterly Journal of Speech, 60(4), 442-449.

A copy of the full paper has not yet been submitted.

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