The presentation will show how innovative learning modules for use in distance learning, blended learning situations and self‐directed learning can be developed for flexible use in universities, companies and by the public. The BioMinE project 2004‐2008 is an integrated project in the EC 6th Framework Programme with 37 partners from 14 countries including South Africa. It is an R&D project that works with the integration of biotechnology based processes for recovery and/or removal of metals from primary ores and concentrates and secondary metal bearing materials. More often this is heard of as "bioleaching", environmentally friendly technologies for parts of the metal extraction process (bioleaching can substitute some smelting and roasting and sometimes be the only environmentally viable alternative for extraction of metal from complicated polymetallic ores. Biohydrometallurgy is a cross‐disciplinary area which includes microbiology, metallurgy, biochemistry, geochemistry, mining engineering, etc. This means that experts with different background will have to cooperate. One of seven work packages in the BioMinE project is "Training", in which 8 partners work. The training activity was planned to mainly produce digital learning modules, "learning objects". This was questionned by some partner from start, as it was considered risky for a cutting‐edge research area, considering intellectual property rights, etc. No other study material than scientific papers was needed, some meant. In the end of 2007 we now have publicly accessible animations, wiki books, web tutorials, ppt presentations and a big and much used wiki, the BiomineW iki (http://wiki.biomine.skelleftea.se/wiki), that has also experts outside the projects contributing to it. In the plans for 2008 are second life environments for understanding modern mining technology including bioleaching. The training material, perhaps as much as the exciting project research results themselves, is on the way of becoming an important component in the international bioleaching community of researchers and technology developers.

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Digital learning objects in biohydrometallurgy in the EC FP6 BioMinE project
Wikis, animations and second life environments.

Anders Norberg   Tillväxt SkellefteaÌŠ / Campusutveckling

The presentation will show how innovative learning modules for use in distance learning, blended learning situations and self‐directed learning can be developed for flexible use in universities, companies and by the public. The BioMinE project 2004‐2008 is an integrated project in the EC 6th Framework Programme with 37 partners from 14 countries including South Africa. It is an R&D project that works with the integration of biotechnology based processes for recovery and/or removal of metals from primary ores and concentrates and secondary metal bearing materials. More often this is heard of as "bioleaching", environmentally friendly technologies for parts of the metal extraction process (bioleaching can substitute some smelting and roasting and sometimes be the only environmentally viable alternative for extraction of metal from complicated polymetallic ores. Biohydrometallurgy is a cross‐disciplinary area which includes microbiology, metallurgy, biochemistry, geochemistry, mining engineering, etc. This means that experts with different background will have to cooperate. One of seven work packages in the BioMinE project is "Training", in which 8 partners work. The training activity was planned to mainly produce digital learning modules, "learning objects". This was questionned by some partner from start, as it was considered risky for a cutting‐edge research area, considering intellectual property rights, etc. No other study material than scientific papers was needed, some meant. In the end of 2007 we now have publicly accessible animations, wiki books, web tutorials, ppt presentations and a big and much used wiki, the BiomineW iki (http://wiki.biomine.skelleftea.se/wiki), that has also experts outside the projects contributing to it. In the plans for 2008 are second life environments for understanding modern mining technology including bioleaching. The training material, perhaps as much as the exciting project research results themselves, is on the way of becoming an important component in the international bioleaching community of researchers and technology developers.

A copy of the full paper has not yet been submitted.

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