Since the mid-1980s, media coverage of science and technology has increasingly become a subject of interest, particularly for researchers in the United States and in some European countries. In other regions, such as Latin America, science journalism research is a relatively new field. Studies have utilized a variety of approaches to analyze how science and technology are depicted in the media. Some common research themes have included assessing how science is depicted in a specific outlet (i.e., in a film, in newspapers, or on television), how a scientific topic is addressed in one or more media over a period of time, or compared how mass communication treats scientific themes or science in general as a topic. More recently, the Internet has become a new space for scholars to analyze how science and technology issues are presented to the public. In this session, we propose to discuss methodological approaches to science journalism research by featuring researchers who use different methodologies in different cultural contexts. By sharing the experiences acquired from their unique backgrounds, researchers will share the pros and cons of each methodology presented. Each presenter will speak for 15 minutes, and the 15 minutes remaining at the end of the session will be open for questions and discussion.
Carolina Moreno Castro (València University, Spain) will talk about the use of content analysis on digital media and official webs combined with structured interviews and public perception surveys. She will discuss the need of methodological triangulation to get interesting results. Moreno-Castro is a Full Professor of Theory of Language and Communication at the University of Valencia (Spain), and a member of the Research Unit on Scientific Culture of CIEMAT. She is a professor of science communication and her research focuses on content analysis of media reports related to science and technology.
Dominique Brossard (Department of Life Sciences Communication, University of Wisconsin-Madison, USA) will talk about methodological approaches to content analysis of new media content, with a special emphasis on  intelligent algorithms. Javier Cruz-Mena (Science Journalism Unit, General Direction of Science Communication, National Autonomous University of Mexico, Mexico), who is a member of the Ibero-American Network of Monitoring and Training on Science Journalism, will discuss the Network’s protocol in the context of Mexican TV newscasts, characterized by flimsy coverage of science, and its adaptation for use on daily and weekly print media, where coverage is a bit more robust. Vanessa Brasil de Carvalho (PhD student of the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Museum of Life / House of Oswaldo Cruz / Fiocruz, Brazil) will present the research experience of the Ibero-American Network of Monitoring and Training on Science Journalism, set up in 2009 and coordinated by the Museum of Life’s Center of Studies on Science Communication. The network involves researchers from 10 Ibero-American countries (Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia, Cuba, Ecuador, Spain, Mexico, Portugal and Venezuela) who developed a content analysis protocol to examine science coverage in TV newscasts combined with a focus group protocol to analyze the content reception by groups of the audience. Ahmet Suerdem (Ä°stanbul Bilgi Üniversitesi, Turkey) will discuss the benefits and challenges of using QDA Miner software.

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 [PCST]
PCST Network

Public Communication of Science and Technology

 

Science journalism research

Carla da Silva Almeida   freelance science writer, Brazil

Carolina Moreno Castro   València University, Spain

Dominique Brossard   Department of Life Sciences Communication, University of Wisconsin-Madison, United States

Javier Cruz-Mena   Science Journalism Unit, General Direction of Science 81 Communication, National Autonomous University of Mexico, Mexico

Vanessa Brasil de Carvalho   PhD student of the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro - Museum of Life/House of Oswaldo Cruz/Oswaldo Cruz Foundation, Brazil

Ahmet Suerdem – Ä°stanbul Bilgi Ãœniversitesi, Turkey

Since the mid-1980s, media coverage of science and technology has increasingly become a subject of interest, particularly for researchers in the United States and in some European countries. In other regions, such as Latin America, science journalism research is a relatively new field. Studies have utilized a variety of approaches to analyze how science and technology are depicted in the media. Some common research themes have included assessing how science is depicted in a specific outlet (i.e., in a film, in newspapers, or on television), how a scientific topic is addressed in one or more media over a period of time, or compared how mass communication treats scientific themes or science in general as a topic. More recently, the Internet has become a new space for scholars to analyze how science and technology issues are presented to the public. In this session, we propose to discuss methodological approaches to science journalism research by featuring researchers who use different methodologies in different cultural contexts. By sharing the experiences acquired from their unique backgrounds, researchers will share the pros and cons of each methodology presented. Each presenter will speak for 15 minutes, and the 15 minutes remaining at the end of the session will be open for questions and discussion.
Carolina Moreno Castro (València University, Spain) will talk about the use of content analysis on digital media and official webs combined with structured interviews and public perception surveys. She will discuss the need of methodological triangulation to get interesting results. Moreno-Castro is a Full Professor of Theory of Language and Communication at the University of Valencia (Spain), and a member of the Research Unit on Scientific Culture of CIEMAT. She is a professor of science communication and her research focuses on content analysis of media reports related to science and technology.
Dominique Brossard (Department of Life Sciences Communication, University of Wisconsin-Madison, USA) will talk about methodological approaches to content analysis of new media content, with a special emphasis on  intelligent algorithms. Javier Cruz-Mena (Science Journalism Unit, General Direction of Science Communication, National Autonomous University of Mexico, Mexico), who is a member of the Ibero-American Network of Monitoring and Training on Science Journalism, will discuss the Network’s protocol in the context of Mexican TV newscasts, characterized by flimsy coverage of science, and its adaptation for use on daily and weekly print media, where coverage is a bit more robust. Vanessa Brasil de Carvalho (PhD student of the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Museum of Life / House of Oswaldo Cruz / Fiocruz, Brazil) will present the research experience of the Ibero-American Network of Monitoring and Training on Science Journalism, set up in 2009 and coordinated by the Museum of Life’s Center of Studies on Science Communication. The network involves researchers from 10 Ibero-American countries (Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia, Cuba, Ecuador, Spain, Mexico, Portugal and Venezuela) who developed a content analysis protocol to examine science coverage in TV newscasts combined with a focus group protocol to analyze the content reception by groups of the audience. Ahmet Suerdem (Ä°stanbul Bilgi Üniversitesi, Turkey) will discuss the benefits and challenges of using QDA Miner software.

A copy of the full paper has not yet been submitted.

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