This session will take off from the WCSJ2013 to discuss issues specifically affecting developing world journalists when writing about science. What are the key challenges and how best to tackle them?

The session will take off from a suggestion in a final article written by a world-renowned veteran of science journalism, late David Dickson, who in July 2013, called for the developing world to organise their own global conference that focuses explicitly on the issues that affect them most. How are the challenges facing reports in developing world different from those in the developed world? Are there overlapping issues? Are there specific issues that only or predominantly affect the developing world journalists and hence get neglected in the global debates of science journalism? If so, what can be done to rectify those?

The session will be structured as a conversation with science journalists from Brazil, Uruguay and Kenya, focusing on specific experiences they have had in their countries and regions.

There is recent academic evidence that while science journalism is in crisis in the developed nations, it is booming in the developing world. Does this reflect personal experiences of these science writers? Where are there countries, especially Latin America, on this spectrum in their views? The session could also form a springboard for further, in-depth discussions at the upcoming WCSJ2015 in Korea.

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Public Communication of Science and Technology

 

Science journalism in the developing world
Specific challenges and potential solutions

Mico Tatalovic   news editor of SciDev.Net, United Kingdom and Croatia

Carla da Silva Almeida   freelance science writer, Brazil

Ochieng Ogodo   former newspaper journalist, Sub-Saharan Africa editor for SciDev.Net

Daniela Hirschfeld   magazine editor (Semanario Búsqueda), university docent, freelance science writer, Uruguay

This session will take off from the WCSJ2013 to discuss issues specifically affecting developing world journalists when writing about science. What are the key challenges and how best to tackle them?

The session will take off from a suggestion in a final article written by a world-renowned veteran of science journalism, late David Dickson, who in July 2013, called for the developing world to organise their own global conference that focuses explicitly on the issues that affect them most. How are the challenges facing reports in developing world different from those in the developed world? Are there overlapping issues? Are there specific issues that only or predominantly affect the developing world journalists and hence get neglected in the global debates of science journalism? If so, what can be done to rectify those?

The session will be structured as a conversation with science journalists from Brazil, Uruguay and Kenya, focusing on specific experiences they have had in their countries and regions.

There is recent academic evidence that while science journalism is in crisis in the developed nations, it is booming in the developing world. Does this reflect personal experiences of these science writers? Where are there countries, especially Latin America, on this spectrum in their views? The session could also form a springboard for further, in-depth discussions at the upcoming WCSJ2015 in Korea.

A copy of the full paper has not yet been submitted.

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