In this presentation, we will describe the collaborative work of a scientist and a team of science journalists to communicate scientific concepts behind technological innovations through a monthly science column – named “From the laboratory to the factory” – in Ciência Hoje On-line, an electronic magazine published by the Brazilian Association for the Advancement of Science. (available at http://cienciahoje.uol.com.br/colunas/do-laboratorio-para-a-fabrica). The topics addressed are usually selected from papers published by Nature, Science and other journals, with the texts presenting new technological devices or discussing concepts likely to be used in industrial applications.
We will mainly discuss its educational role and the potential of the column to anticipate tendencies in the fields of physics and keep the readers updated with the most current debates in the area. For example, in 2010, we discussed the applications of graphene twice (in February and June) before the Nobel Prize in Physics was awarded jointly to Andre Geim and Konstantin Novoselov for its discovery. The number of papers on this subject grew almost geometrically from 2006 to 2009, a tendency which deserved our attention before the Nobel Committee nomination. On March 27 2009, we published the text “The long walk of the e-paper”, a subject that had not been mentioned by Nature and Science for the previous four years. On April 1 2009, Nature published “Technology: The textbook of the future”. Simply coincidence or feeling fit?
As for its educational potential, it is interesting to note that several texts of the column discuss related issues, forming consistent conceptual maps. Teachers interested in discussing magnetism with their students, for instance, will find stories about giant magnetoelectric and magnetoresistance effects, magnetic nanoparticles for drug delivery, MRAM memory, nanomedicine, nanopharmacology, spintronic devices and spin valve. So, basic magnetic concepts are viewed in different scientific and technological contexts.
">
 [PCST]
PCST Network

Public Communication of Science and Technology

 

From the laboratory to the factory
Communicating science concepts behind technological innovations

Carlos Santos   IMEA - UNILA

Carla Almeida   Ciência Hoje On-line

Thaís Fernandes   Ciência Hoje On-line

Bernardo Esteves   Revista Piauí

In this presentation, we will describe the collaborative work of a scientist and a team of science journalists to communicate scientific concepts behind technological innovations through a monthly science column – named “From the laboratory to the factory” – in Ciência Hoje On-line, an electronic magazine published by the Brazilian Association for the Advancement of Science. (available at http://cienciahoje.uol.com.br/colunas/do-laboratorio-para-a-fabrica). The topics addressed are usually selected from papers published by Nature, Science and other journals, with the texts presenting new technological devices or discussing concepts likely to be used in industrial applications.
We will mainly discuss its educational role and the potential of the column to anticipate tendencies in the fields of physics and keep the readers updated with the most current debates in the area. For example, in 2010, we discussed the applications of graphene twice (in February and June) before the Nobel Prize in Physics was awarded jointly to Andre Geim and Konstantin Novoselov for its discovery. The number of papers on this subject grew almost geometrically from 2006 to 2009, a tendency which deserved our attention before the Nobel Committee nomination. On March 27 2009, we published the text “The long walk of the e-paper”, a subject that had not been mentioned by Nature and Science for the previous four years. On April 1 2009, Nature published “Technology: The textbook of the future”. Simply coincidence or feeling fit?
As for its educational potential, it is interesting to note that several texts of the column discuss related issues, forming consistent conceptual maps. Teachers interested in discussing magnetism with their students, for instance, will find stories about giant magnetoelectric and magnetoresistance effects, magnetic nanoparticles for drug delivery, MRAM memory, nanomedicine, nanopharmacology, spintronic devices and spin valve. So, basic magnetic concepts are viewed in different scientific and technological contexts.

A copy of the full paper has not yet been submitted.

BACK TO TOP