Background: Science and research gain more and more concern in the view of citizens and reach the front pages of newspapers. However, researchers, communicators, journalists and European audiences often complain that "there is not enough science in the media".

Objective: The session will present and discuss with the audience current trends and challenges for European science journalism, in particular:

•How to promote the visibility of European science in the media?
•How to link science and society - the respective roles of scientists, editors, journalists and producers?
•New training for new competencies: how to tackle the human resources issues?

Methods: A panel discussion is proposed with the following speakers: C. Madsen (ESO, DE), S. Miller (University College London, UK), H.-P. Peters
(Jülich Centre, DE), P. Bijvoet (VRT, BE), M.-C. Roland (INRA, FR). Moderator: M. Claessens (European Commission, EU). The discussion will start with a short presentation of several recent reports on these issues,
including:
•Three European Commission's surveys (December 2007) on science in the media in Europe, as perceived by European citizens (Eurobarometer), researchers, and journalists/editors
•A handbook (December 2007) on EU-wide training opportunities for science journalists.
The panel will address the following questions:
•Important science versus interesting science: which role for peer-reviewed journals?
•Internet and new media: friend or foe for the science journalist?
•Is science investigative journalism dead?
•Do we need to move science "out of the ghetto"?
•Press and information officers: science allies or spin doctors?
•Should scientists rethink their communication practices?
•Are there specific training and human resources issues?
Expected results: The session should contribute to:
•Raise awareness about recent trends in the European media and science landscapes
•Discuss the changing roles of the actors in bringing science and society closer
•Highlight the need for new competencies among all the actors involved.

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PCST Network

Public Communication of Science and Technology

 

European trends and challenges in science journalism

Michel Claessens   European Commission, Communication Unit, Research Directorate-General

Background: Science and research gain more and more concern in the view of citizens and reach the front pages of newspapers. However, researchers, communicators, journalists and European audiences often complain that "there is not enough science in the media".

Objective: The session will present and discuss with the audience current trends and challenges for European science journalism, in particular:

•How to promote the visibility of European science in the media?
•How to link science and society - the respective roles of scientists, editors, journalists and producers?
•New training for new competencies: how to tackle the human resources issues?

Methods: A panel discussion is proposed with the following speakers: C. Madsen (ESO, DE), S. Miller (University College London, UK), H.-P. Peters
(Jülich Centre, DE), P. Bijvoet (VRT, BE), M.-C. Roland (INRA, FR). Moderator: M. Claessens (European Commission, EU). The discussion will start with a short presentation of several recent reports on these issues,
including:
•Three European Commission's surveys (December 2007) on science in the media in Europe, as perceived by European citizens (Eurobarometer), researchers, and journalists/editors
•A handbook (December 2007) on EU-wide training opportunities for science journalists.
The panel will address the following questions:
•Important science versus interesting science: which role for peer-reviewed journals?
•Internet and new media: friend or foe for the science journalist?
•Is science investigative journalism dead?
•Do we need to move science "out of the ghetto"?
•Press and information officers: science allies or spin doctors?
•Should scientists rethink their communication practices?
•Are there specific training and human resources issues?
Expected results: The session should contribute to:
•Raise awareness about recent trends in the European media and science landscapes
•Discuss the changing roles of the actors in bringing science and society closer
•Highlight the need for new competencies among all the actors involved.

A copy of the full paper has not yet been submitted.

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