Around 14:46 on March 11 (Friday) of the year 2011, a magnitude 9.0 earthquake struck off the northeastern coast of the Tohoku District of Japan. As a result, the following 11 out of 14 nuclear power plant units located near the epicenter automatically tripped.
The people and mass media of Korea, the closest country to Japan, showed a great interest in the accident of the Japanese nuclear power plants. In order to respond to the explosive interest of the public and mass media, KINS (Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety) opened a special webpage dedicated to the Japanese nuclear accident within the KINS homepage on March 12. Through this webpage, reliable information about the evolving events was promptly presented as accurately as possible. Situation telephones to respond to inquiries of the public were also set up with 5 KINS staffers to respond to the questions from the public. KINS are also trying to actively provide information by establishing a team to respond to the press, distributing the press release, holding press conferences, giving interviews, helping to resolve inquiries and collect news, etc.
The people showed the greatest interest in domestic environmental dose rates in connection with the Japan’s nuclear accident. In view of such high interest, KINS exerted the utmost efforts to ease the public and keep them from panicking by posting the results of real-time environmental radiation measurement results in the main domestic portal sites (i.e., Naver, Daum, and Nate) that the people most frequently visit.
Spokespersons and experts of the Government, KINS and other relevant organizations endeavored to present correct information to the public through press interviews, a contribution of a number of articles to newspapers, and so on.
As the events at the Japanese nuclear power plant unfolded, the situation team responded to interview requests, inquiries, requests to cover news from television news broadcasts, newspapers, news magazines, local media, and so on. The interest of the press and public regarding the Japanese nuclear accident changed over time, and therefore, a timely press response was necessary in view of the evolving interest. A great deal of experience and lessons were obtained in connection with the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident, especially from a perspective of public communication.
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Public Communication of Science and Technology

 

Communication activities with the public Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident

Jin-A Jeong   Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety (KINS)

Gey-Hwi Lee   Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety (KINS)

Around 14:46 on March 11 (Friday) of the year 2011, a magnitude 9.0 earthquake struck off the northeastern coast of the Tohoku District of Japan. As a result, the following 11 out of 14 nuclear power plant units located near the epicenter automatically tripped.
The people and mass media of Korea, the closest country to Japan, showed a great interest in the accident of the Japanese nuclear power plants. In order to respond to the explosive interest of the public and mass media, KINS (Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety) opened a special webpage dedicated to the Japanese nuclear accident within the KINS homepage on March 12. Through this webpage, reliable information about the evolving events was promptly presented as accurately as possible. Situation telephones to respond to inquiries of the public were also set up with 5 KINS staffers to respond to the questions from the public. KINS are also trying to actively provide information by establishing a team to respond to the press, distributing the press release, holding press conferences, giving interviews, helping to resolve inquiries and collect news, etc.
The people showed the greatest interest in domestic environmental dose rates in connection with the Japan’s nuclear accident. In view of such high interest, KINS exerted the utmost efforts to ease the public and keep them from panicking by posting the results of real-time environmental radiation measurement results in the main domestic portal sites (i.e., Naver, Daum, and Nate) that the people most frequently visit.
Spokespersons and experts of the Government, KINS and other relevant organizations endeavored to present correct information to the public through press interviews, a contribution of a number of articles to newspapers, and so on.
As the events at the Japanese nuclear power plant unfolded, the situation team responded to interview requests, inquiries, requests to cover news from television news broadcasts, newspapers, news magazines, local media, and so on. The interest of the press and public regarding the Japanese nuclear accident changed over time, and therefore, a timely press response was necessary in view of the evolving interest. A great deal of experience and lessons were obtained in connection with the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident, especially from a perspective of public communication.

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