Science, technology and innovation (STI) plays a major role in the global economy, and new tools and instruments for public and societal engagement are needed to boost the quality, capacity and legitimacy of STI governance worldwide. In Europe, more effective and socially acceptable decisions on STI are called for to solve the looming problems related to the grand societal challenges, as delineated in the new EU Framework Programme for Research and Innovation, Horizon 2020. To support a healthy renewal in this field, the European Commission has funded a research project PE2020 – Public Engagement Innovations for Horizon 2020 that aims to identify the most innovative public engagement (PE) tools in Europe and beyond, and develop a tool for science policy actors that helps them identify, evaluate and successfully transfer innovative PE practices between countries. In so doing, new opportunities can be found for countries to mobilize the capacity of their citizens and scientific systems to solve urgent societal challenges pressing their societies, and possibly to accelerate research-based innovation processes and make them more effective. In this session, presenters and participants will discuss the state  of the art and trends in the field of PE, with a particular emphasis on discussing promising approaches to identifying and analyzing innovative PE tools and instruments that might contribute to dynamic governance of science in society. There will be four presentations in this session, each discussing the theme of PE innovation in science from different angles and regional perspectives: 1. Towards an inventory and typology of innovative European PE practices – This paper presents a preliminary list of 50 examples of particularly innovative PE tools and instruments in European STI policy. Examples have been harvested from previous cross-European efforts to monitor PE activities, and the paper will explain and discuss the procedure for selection, and propose a strategy for typologizing PE activities in the European context. Dr. Niels Mejlgaard, Director of the Danish Centre for Studies in Research and Research Policy, Aarhus University, Denmark o Ph.D. fellow Tine Ravn, the Danish Centre for Studies in Research and Research Policy, Aarhus University, Denmark 2. Participatory performance in research program context – ‘Participatory performance’ refers to level and quality of public dialogues on STI. Factors contributing to participatory performance have been modeled at the level of national performance, including supportive resources, demand conditions, governmental strategies and other factors. This paper opens a critical debate about such factors at the level of research programs. Dr. Mikko Rask, Senior Researcher at the National Consumer Research Centre Finland, Academy of Finland PostDoctoral Researcher o Dr. Saule Maciukaite Zviniene, Head of Higher Education Policy Analysis Unit at Research and Higher Education Monitoring and Analysis Center in Vilnius. 3. Distributed, collaborative 21st century approach to participatory technology assessment (pTA) in the United States. Constituted independently of the government, the ECAST model integrates citizen participation, deliberation, expertise and assessment into government policy making, management, research, development, informal education and dissemination at the national and international levels. This approach connects independent, non-partisan and non-profit organizations into a nationwide network. Gretchen Gano, Doctoral candidate, Human and Social Dimensions of Science and Technology Program, Arizona State University, David Sittenfeld, Program Manager, Forum, Museum of Science, Boston 4. Recent Trends and New Approaches of PE in Japan – This  paper discusses recent national level participatory processes, including a deliberative poll on national energy choices, the firstever participatory and deliberative process that directly informed national policy making in the country, and a new workshop program, where people can casually deliberate on trans-scientific or science-in-society issues, to be developed in collaboration with high schools and science centers and seeking possibilities of creating spheres of dialogue on science and technology  nationwide. The adaptation, achievements and challenges of these initiatives will be discussed. A tension between the purposes of awareness raising and citizen empowerment is among the key themes underlying the recent efforts to introduce innovative PE tools to STI governance. Balancing strategies and trade-offs between these dual purposes will be discussed in this session.

">
 [PCST]
PCST Network

Public Communication of Science and Technology

 

Innovative public engagement practices in Europe and beyond

Mikko Tapani Rask   National Consumer Research Centre, Finland

Niels Mejlgaard   Danish Centre for Studies in Research and Research Policy, Aarhus University, Denmark

Tine Ravn   Danish Centre for Studies in Research and Research Policy, Aarhus University, Denmark

Saule Maciukaite Zviniene   Higher Education Policy Analysis Unit at Research and Higher Education Monitoring and Analysis Center, Lithuania

Gretchen Gano   Human and Social Dimensions of Science and Technology Program, Arizona State University, United States

David Sittenfeld – Museum of Science, Boston, United States

Science, technology and innovation (STI) plays a major role in the global economy, and new tools and instruments for public and societal engagement are needed to boost the quality, capacity and legitimacy of STI governance worldwide. In Europe, more effective and socially acceptable decisions on STI are called for to solve the looming problems related to the grand societal challenges, as delineated in the new EU Framework Programme for Research and Innovation, Horizon 2020. To support a healthy renewal in this field, the European Commission has funded a research project PE2020 – Public Engagement Innovations for Horizon 2020 that aims to identify the most innovative public engagement (PE) tools in Europe and beyond, and develop a tool for science policy actors that helps them identify, evaluate and successfully transfer innovative PE practices between countries. In so doing, new opportunities can be found for countries to mobilize the capacity of their citizens and scientific systems to solve urgent societal challenges pressing their societies, and possibly to accelerate research-based innovation processes and make them more effective. In this session, presenters and participants will discuss the state  of the art and trends in the field of PE, with a particular emphasis on discussing promising approaches to identifying and analyzing innovative PE tools and instruments that might contribute to dynamic governance of science in society. There will be four presentations in this session, each discussing the theme of PE innovation in science from different angles and regional perspectives: 1. Towards an inventory and typology of innovative European PE practices – This paper presents a preliminary list of 50 examples of particularly innovative PE tools and instruments in European STI policy. Examples have been harvested from previous cross-European efforts to monitor PE activities, and the paper will explain and discuss the procedure for selection, and propose a strategy for typologizing PE activities in the European context. Dr. Niels Mejlgaard, Director of the Danish Centre for Studies in Research and Research Policy, Aarhus University, Denmark o Ph.D. fellow Tine Ravn, the Danish Centre for Studies in Research and Research Policy, Aarhus University, Denmark 2. Participatory performance in research program context – ‘Participatory performance’ refers to level and quality of public dialogues on STI. Factors contributing to participatory performance have been modeled at the level of national performance, including supportive resources, demand conditions, governmental strategies and other factors. This paper opens a critical debate about such factors at the level of research programs. Dr. Mikko Rask, Senior Researcher at the National Consumer Research Centre Finland, Academy of Finland PostDoctoral Researcher o Dr. Saule Maciukaite Zviniene, Head of Higher Education Policy Analysis Unit at Research and Higher Education Monitoring and Analysis Center in Vilnius. 3. Distributed, collaborative 21st century approach to participatory technology assessment (pTA) in the United States. Constituted independently of the government, the ECAST model integrates citizen participation, deliberation, expertise and assessment into government policy making, management, research, development, informal education and dissemination at the national and international levels. This approach connects independent, non-partisan and non-profit organizations into a nationwide network. Gretchen Gano, Doctoral candidate, Human and Social Dimensions of Science and Technology Program, Arizona State University, David Sittenfeld, Program Manager, Forum, Museum of Science, Boston 4. Recent Trends and New Approaches of PE in Japan – This  paper discusses recent national level participatory processes, including a deliberative poll on national energy choices, the firstever participatory and deliberative process that directly informed national policy making in the country, and a new workshop program, where people can casually deliberate on trans-scientific or science-in-society issues, to be developed in collaboration with high schools and science centers and seeking possibilities of creating spheres of dialogue on science and technology  nationwide. The adaptation, achievements and challenges of these initiatives will be discussed. A tension between the purposes of awareness raising and citizen empowerment is among the key themes underlying the recent efforts to introduce innovative PE tools to STI governance. Balancing strategies and trade-offs between these dual purposes will be discussed in this session.

A copy of the full paper has not yet been submitted.

BACK TO TOP