Many of Japanese scholars might be surprised when they read Wynne (1992) afterFukushima nuclear incident. The situation of Japan is incredibly similar to Lake Districtof Cumbria, Northern England about the reaction of scientific authorities and publicsto the consequence of radioactive contamination, which was induced by explosionof Chernobyl nuclear plant in 1986: repeating statement that radioactive fall-outwas not affecting our lives, failed prediction by authoritative scientists, responsesfrom scientific communities without reflexivity, patriarchal behaviors of Japanesegovernment, and now, credibility and trustworthiness of scientists were increasinglydiminishing. We can say that the situation which Wynne wrote about has beenreplayed in Japan after twenty-five year. In this presentation, we draw the publicreception of scientific knowledge from a case study of Japanese mothers’ responsesto the scientific advices about radioactive contamination as a Japanese version of“Cumbrian sheep farmers”.

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Public Communication of Science and Technology

 

“Misunderstood misunderstanding”, again. – mother’s movement against radiation contamination emerged after fukushima nuclear incident in Japan

Nozomi Mizushima   Interfaculty Initiative in Information Studies, Univ. of Tokyo, Japan

Ikuko Kase   Interdisciplinary Information Studies, University of Tokyo, Japan

Osamu Sakura   Interfaculty Initiative in Information Studies, Univ. of Tokyo, Japan

Many of Japanese scholars might be surprised when they read Wynne (1992) afterFukushima nuclear incident. The situation of Japan is incredibly similar to Lake Districtof Cumbria, Northern England about the reaction of scientific authorities and publicsto the consequence of radioactive contamination, which was induced by explosionof Chernobyl nuclear plant in 1986: repeating statement that radioactive fall-outwas not affecting our lives, failed prediction by authoritative scientists, responsesfrom scientific communities without reflexivity, patriarchal behaviors of Japanesegovernment, and now, credibility and trustworthiness of scientists were increasinglydiminishing. We can say that the situation which Wynne wrote about has beenreplayed in Japan after twenty-five year. In this presentation, we draw the publicreception of scientific knowledge from a case study of Japanese mothers’ responsesto the scientific advices about radioactive contamination as a Japanese version of“Cumbrian sheep farmers”.

A copy of the full paper has not yet been submitted.

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