The structural and behavioral effects of neonatal anoxia are part of a study in ourlab, which involves students and collaborators of different labs and institutions.Neonatal anoxia is a worldwide clinical problem that causes encephalic alterations inhuman neonates leading to serious and lasting consequences in the body and brain.Therefore, finding a suitable animal model of anoxia was our goal in order to address this multidisciplinary study under controlled conditions and search for interrelations between particularities of the ensuing sequelae and morph-functional changes. So,we adapted from literature a model of neonatal anoxia in rats, which comprises asemi-hermetic system suitable for complete oxygen deprivation. The efficiency of the model was confirmed by clinical, physiological and his tological procedures (Takada etal., 2011). We could confirm that neurons and glial cells were activated in respiratory control areas and we observed significant differences in the hippo campus of control and an oxia groups. The model proved suitable for our purposes.
Differential effects were observed in glial cells of the hippo campus according tothe maturational stage of the region at birth. Also, neuron activation, cell death and neuro genesis were studied in hippo campus. Interestingly, an increased cell proliferation was observed after 60 days of the neonatal an oxia stimulus. Behavioral changes were observed in spatial reference memory, working memory, sensory disturbance, anxiety and acquisition of conditioned fear of sound and context.However, with more days of tests, the an oxic animals could achieve performance which was close to that of the normal group. These results, in spite of the need tobe more explored, have already revealed that anoxic condition is harmful to brain areas related to these behaviors, but also confirm the power of neuro plasticity since prompt and right diagnostic might provide suitable therapy that can minimize the promoted effects.
Therefore communicating these data to the physicians, nurses, physiotherapists,pregnant women and general public, is very important in order to avoid or minimize conditions that may lead to anoxic condition. Science communication activities of these data have been provided such as lectures, mini-courses and interactive exhibitions to communicate the scientific findings. We observed that the attend ees of the proposed activities enjoyed knowing the causes, principles and mechanismsof those effects in motility, behavior and cognition as well as the identification of possible preventive and therapeutic approaches to the theme.
Grants: FAPESP, CAPES, CNPq, USP-PRPq
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Public Communication of Science and Technology

 

Anoxia neonatal
A clinical problem getting benefits from science communication

Maria Nogueira   Institute of Biomedical Sciences, Institute of Psicology and Estação Ciência-PRCEU-USP of Universidade de São Paulo

Silvia Takada   Institute of Biomedical Sciences, Institute of Psicology and Estação Ciência-PRCEU-USP of Universidade de São Paulo

Wilma Allemandi   Institute of Biomedical Sciences, Institute of Psicology and Estação Ciência-PRCEU-USP of Universidade de São Paulo

Paula Ito   Institute of Biomedical Sciences, Institute of Psicology and Estação Ciência-PRCEU-USP of Universidade de São Paulo

Barbara Martins   Institute of Biomedical Sciences, Institute of Psicology and Estação Ciência-PRCEU-USP of Universidade de São Paulo

Vitor Lee РInstitute of Biomedical Sciences, Institute of Psicology and Esta̤̣o Ci̻ncia-PRCEU-USP of Universidade de Ṣo Paulo

The structural and behavioral effects of neonatal anoxia are part of a study in ourlab, which involves students and collaborators of different labs and institutions.Neonatal anoxia is a worldwide clinical problem that causes encephalic alterations inhuman neonates leading to serious and lasting consequences in the body and brain.Therefore, finding a suitable animal model of anoxia was our goal in order to address this multidisciplinary study under controlled conditions and search for interrelations between particularities of the ensuing sequelae and morph-functional changes. So,we adapted from literature a model of neonatal anoxia in rats, which comprises asemi-hermetic system suitable for complete oxygen deprivation. The efficiency of the model was confirmed by clinical, physiological and his tological procedures (Takada etal., 2011). We could confirm that neurons and glial cells were activated in respiratory control areas and we observed significant differences in the hippo campus of control and an oxia groups. The model proved suitable for our purposes.
Differential effects were observed in glial cells of the hippo campus according tothe maturational stage of the region at birth. Also, neuron activation, cell death and neuro genesis were studied in hippo campus. Interestingly, an increased cell proliferation was observed after 60 days of the neonatal an oxia stimulus. Behavioral changes were observed in spatial reference memory, working memory, sensory disturbance, anxiety and acquisition of conditioned fear of sound and context.However, with more days of tests, the an oxic animals could achieve performance which was close to that of the normal group. These results, in spite of the need tobe more explored, have already revealed that anoxic condition is harmful to brain areas related to these behaviors, but also confirm the power of neuro plasticity since prompt and right diagnostic might provide suitable therapy that can minimize the promoted effects.
Therefore communicating these data to the physicians, nurses, physiotherapists,pregnant women and general public, is very important in order to avoid or minimize conditions that may lead to anoxic condition. Science communication activities of these data have been provided such as lectures, mini-courses and interactive exhibitions to communicate the scientific findings. We observed that the attend ees of the proposed activities enjoyed knowing the causes, principles and mechanismsof those effects in motility, behavior and cognition as well as the identification of possible preventive and therapeutic approaches to the theme.
Grants: FAPESP, CAPES, CNPq, USP-PRPq

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