Growing media attention toward scientific topics and increasing presence of science in the media (medialization of science) has been identified by several researchers. Some scholars argue that increased media presence is primarily characteristic of specific scientific fields, such as biomedical and biotechnological sciences (noticed by Bader, 1990; Bauer, 1998; Bucchi and Mazzolini, 2003). Also, researchers suggest that the social sciences and humanities are perceived as less scientific and have a lower epistemological and scientific status, both in the media and the public (Cassidy, 2008). But so far studies did not yield unambiguous conclusion about the (under) representation of certain disciplines in the media coverage of science.
In other words, studies indicate that the media coverage of different scientific fieldsmay considerably vary in quantity and quality. Differences can be explained by theories of public sphere and mass media – media selection – or by epistemological cultures – some scientific fields are more autonomous, while the others are more intertwined with social sphere and therefore more publicly discussed.
Motivated by these theses, the main goal of my research is twofold. First, to answer whether differences in amount of media coverage of different scientific disciplines exist and whether they have changed significantly over time. And second, to determine whether there are qualitative differences in media coverage of scientific disciplines (with an emphasis on social sciences and humanities).
The study will be based on content analysis of science related articles that appeared in a sample of the most read Croatian daily newspapers in two periods: late socialist period (between 1986 and 1988) and (post)transitional period (between 2006 and 2008).
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Differences in the quantity and quality of media coverage of different scientific disciplines
The case of Croatia

Adrijana Å uljok   Institute for Social Research in Zagreb

Growing media attention toward scientific topics and increasing presence of science in the media (medialization of science) has been identified by several researchers. Some scholars argue that increased media presence is primarily characteristic of specific scientific fields, such as biomedical and biotechnological sciences (noticed by Bader, 1990; Bauer, 1998; Bucchi and Mazzolini, 2003). Also, researchers suggest that the social sciences and humanities are perceived as less scientific and have a lower epistemological and scientific status, both in the media and the public (Cassidy, 2008). But so far studies did not yield unambiguous conclusion about the (under) representation of certain disciplines in the media coverage of science.
In other words, studies indicate that the media coverage of different scientific fieldsmay considerably vary in quantity and quality. Differences can be explained by theories of public sphere and mass media – media selection – or by epistemological cultures – some scientific fields are more autonomous, while the others are more intertwined with social sphere and therefore more publicly discussed.
Motivated by these theses, the main goal of my research is twofold. First, to answer whether differences in amount of media coverage of different scientific disciplines exist and whether they have changed significantly over time. And second, to determine whether there are qualitative differences in media coverage of scientific disciplines (with an emphasis on social sciences and humanities).
The study will be based on content analysis of science related articles that appeared in a sample of the most read Croatian daily newspapers in two periods: late socialist period (between 1986 and 1988) and (post)transitional period (between 2006 and 2008).

A copy of the full paper has not yet been submitted.

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